Capture All:
A Sonic Investigation


Image credit: Image courtesy of Laura McLean and Mehak Sawhney.


About this event

Australia Council for the Arts in partnership with Liquid Architecture (Melbourne) and Sarai (New Delhi) invite applications from applicants based in Australia and India for Capture All: A Sonic Investigation.

How might experimental practices of sound and listening be mobilised as resources for understanding and intervening in questions of power, capture, and extraction? What aesthetic and political possibilities emerge by investigating sonic practices in relation to both domestic and urban space and their network interfaces?

Throughout 2021, Liquid Architecture (Melbourne) and Sarai (Delhi) will collaborate to support six artists, scholars, and writers based in Australia and India through a series of creative and critical workshops, intensives, and dialogues. Capture All sets out to investigate the sonic at a moment of accelerating surveillance capitalism that enmeshes individuals and communities in networks of capture and control.

This opportunity is contextualised and grounded in Sarai’s pioneering work on critical questions of media and information, urbanism, infrastructure, media archaeology, data and law, the commons, and the public domain in South Asia, and in Liquid Architecture’s ongoing research project ‘Machine Listening, a curriculum’, a critical platform for writing, interviews, music and artworks investigating the dystopian and utopian effects of algorithmic, machinic, networked and technologised listening on our social and political lives.

Capture All will consider Australia and India’s complex relationships to coloniality and extraction, and contemporary sonic transformations across physical and digital spaces in both countries. Within these contexts, we are interested in the ways user data is extracted, exploited, monetised, and used to govern user behaviour. Equally we are also interested in public and private sound; evolving uses of mobile phones and social media; the idea and reality of the ‘smart city’; uses of voice interfaces, biometrics, and sonic databases; forms of forensic listening; the economics of data-labour and listening-labour; the production and politics of artificial intelligence; music cultures and streaming; new acoustic ecologies; and sound and listening as modes of evasion and resistance.

In the midst of the profound mediatisation and turbulence of interpersonal relations – particularly in the wake of pandemic-induced lockdowns that have altered our online and offline, local and global engagements – this project aims to critically inhabit so-called ‘immaterial’ spaces and consider the value and agency of our online and offline togetherness.

We are seeking expressions of interest from artists, scholars, musicians, programmers, and writers who are interested in how experimental practices of sound and listening can help us understand the entangled networks we live, work, and play in, and develop new forms of critique and intervention. The selected cohort will meet online for workshops, talks, readings, and listening sessions, facilitated by the curators and special guests. Each participant will be encouraged to develop an aspect of their practice or research related to these conversations, and supported in making a public presentation of their work at the conclusion of the program. It is intended that works, ideas, and research developed through Capture All will inform and connect with future iterations of Liquid Architecture’s Machine Listening program at the level of public outcomes.


Program partners

For the past 20 years, Liquid Architecture and Sarai have operated at the forefront of media and sound practice and research.

Liquid Architecture has been Australia’s leading organisation for artists working with sound and listening. LA investigates the sounds themselves, but also the ideas communicated about, and the meaning of, sound and listening. Its program stages encounters and creates spaces for sonic experience, and critical reflection on sonority and systems of sonic affect.

The Sarai Programme, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies (CSDS), has been South Asia’s most prominent and productive platform for research and reflection on the transformation of urban space and contemporary realities, especially with regard to cities, data and information, law, and media infrastructures.


Funding support

The level of funding support available is $1,500 AUD per participant for six participants. The program will support 3 applicants from Australia and 3 applicants from India. This is intended as a fee for workshop participation and related project research and development. Additional superannuation will be paid for Australian participants.

 

The Australia Council invites applications from individuals based in Australia and India with artistic, musical, research, writing and/or curatorial interests.

You are required to respond to the following assessment criteria:

  1. The impact of the project in developing future opportunities between Australia and India and enhancing relationships between the two countries.
  2. Demonstrated understanding of, and commitment to, discursive modes of research and practice.
  3. Evidence of an expanded understanding of listening and sound.
  4. The timeliness of this opportunity and a demonstrated ability to plan and deliver on any international outcomes that may arise.

The Australia Council, Liquid Architecture and Sarai strongly encourage applications from applicants who identify as First Nations, from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CaLD) backgrounds, people with disability, and people living in regional and remote areas.

Our programs and processes are designed for accessibility and best use by a diverse demographic. Please contact us at least 2 weeks prior to the closing date to discuss your access and support requirements.

A 500 word Expression of Interest (EOI) attached as a .doc or .pdf, maximum 2-page CV, and selected sample of work.

Australia Council staff in consultation with Liquid Architecture and Sarai will consider applications according to the assessment criteria above and will seek recommendations by industry advisors as needed.

You will be informed of the outcome of your application by 10 February 2021.

 

Learn more about other available opportunities.

Additional information

Once you submit your application, we will send you an email acknowledging receipt of your application.

After you submit your application, we first check it meets the eligibility criteria for the grant or opportunity to which you are applying.

Applications to the Australia Council Grant Programs are assessed by arts practice peer panels against the published assessment criteria for the relevant grant program.

We aim to notify you of the outcome of your application no later than 12 weeks after the published closing date for the applicable grant round.

Once all applications have been assessed, you will be contacted about the outcome of your application. If you have been successful, you will also be sent a funding agreement. This outlines the conditions of funding, how you will be paid and your grant reporting requirements. The following accordion items outline these stages in more detail.

If your application is successful, you will receive an email advising you a grant is offered. You must then agree to the conditions of your grant, which represents the Australia Council’s contract with you – this can be done online, by email or by letter. Payment of a grant will not be made until the grant conditions have been agreed and accepted by all the relevant parties.

You should not start a project that depends on a grant until all relevant parties have agreed and accepted the grant conditions and we have evidence of such acceptance on file.

Standard grant conditions require you to, among other things:

  • seek prior approval for making a change to a funded project (for example, changes in the activity budget; changes to key creative personnel; or changes to start or end dates)
  • respond to requests for information about the project or grant
  • satisfactorily account for how the grant is spent (if you do not you will be required to return all monies for which you cannot satisfactorily account)
  • comply with all applicable laws
  • acknowledge the Australia Council’s support in all promotional material associated with the project; this includes use of the Australia Council’s logo and a standard text of acknowledgement.
  • provide artistic and financial acquittal reports at the end of the project
  • return any unspent grant funds at the completion of your project or on notice from us to return such unspent funds.

Grant agreements must be signed by a legal entity – either a legally constituted organisation or an individual. For unincorporated groups, see the section on administered grants

All individual or organisation grant applicants based in Australia must have an ABN. Individual applicants without an ABN may have their grant administered by an individual or organisation with an ABN. Organisations operating outside of Australia do not need an ABN to apply. Individuals based outside of Australia may not need an ABN to apply, depending on their circumstances (please check with your accountant or tax advisor).

The name of the applicant must match the name of the ABN and the name of the bank account into which we pay the funds. There are no exceptions to this rule. If applicants cannot provide an ABN and bank account that are in the same name as the applicant’s name, they will need to nominate an administrator for their grant.

Groups/ensembles/collectives, unincorporated associations/ unincorporated entities and other bodies with no legal status do not need an administrator if they have an active Australian Business Number (ABN) and bank account in their name. If they are unable to provide an active ABN and bank account that matches the name of the applicant, they must nominate an administrator. The name of the administrator must match the name of the ABN and bank account into which funds are paid if the application is successful.

If we approve your application you will need accept the conditions of the grant in a funding agreement.

After you accept your funding agreement online, we will automatically generate a payment for the grant on your behalf. You do not need to send us an invoice.

We will pay grant funds directly into your nominated bank account within two weeks after acceptance of the funding agreement. Grant payments cannot be postponed.

If you do not wish to have the grant funds paid directly into your bank account you can choose to have your grant administered by another individual or legally constituted organisation (Doesn’t apply to Arts Projects – Organisations).

When you apply, you will be asked to provide an active Australian Business Number or ‘ABN’. The ABN that you provide must correspond to the name of the applicant (or the administering body, if one has been nominated). When you accept your funding agreement, you will be asked to enter the details of the bank account you wish the grant to be paid into. The name associated with that bank account must correspond to the name in which the ABN has been registered.

Download the Australia Council for the Arts logo guidelines here.

Download the Major Festivals Initiative logo guidelines here.

Grant reports are required on completion of your project. Acquitting a grant means accurately reporting on the funded activities and the expenditure of Australia Council funding.

Please read your funding agreement to check details of the grant acquittal material you should provide.

The grant acquittal report is where you tell us:

  • how you spent your grant
  • what the artistic outcomes of your funded activity were.

If you do not provide a satisfactory grant report at the times and in the manner detailed in your funding agreement, the Australia Council will not make any further payments that may be due to you, and you will not be eligible  to apply for further grants.

If you do not provide a satisfactory grant report, the Australia Council may ask you to pay back all or part of the funding provided to you.

Grant reports are used by the Australia Council to fulfil obligations of accountability to the Australian Government. They are also essential to the development work of the Australia Council. The reports help us evaluate the achievements of funded activities, monitor the effectiveness of grant categories and ensure our policy development is consistent with the experience of artists in the field.

Reporting for Multi-year Funded Organisations

Organisations in receipt of multi-year funding are required to submit financial, statistical, and artistic reporting on an annual basis.

All reporting is submitted online via the Australia Council’s arts organisations reporting system.

If you are not sure what reporting you need to submit as part of your annual reporting, or what information to provide, please get in touch with your Australia Council contact.

All recipients must acknowledge that the Australia Council provided funding for their activities. When you acquit your grant, we will ask you how you acknowledged the Australia Council.

For printed or online material use our logo and this phrase:

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body OR The (company name) is assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

Logos for download and guidelines for the use of our logos.

Where projects do not have a public outcome, or do not produce any printed or online material, you will need to think about how best to acknowledge the Australia Council funding.