re(situate) Biennale Delegates Program

The program will facilitate exchange of ideas, catalyse new perspectives and support the seeding of future projects and collaborations.

Biennale Delegates 2019 at the Assembly exhibition opening. Image credit: Zan Wimberley.

About the program

The Australia Council Biennale Delegates Program is a professional development opportunity for individuals based in Australia. The 2022 theme is re(situate), an offer to refocus and reposition as we step into this next era in international engagement within the visual arts.

The program will facilitate exchange of ideas, catalyse new perspectives and support the seeding of future projects and collaborations. This edition will counterpoint the prevailing legacies of foundational biennale models with emergent and regionally specific modes of practice tethered to the Asia Pacific region.

Participants will connect to:

  • 59th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia (online)
  • Hawaiʻi Triennial (online)
  • Documenta 15 (online)
  • The Biennale of Sydney (face-to-face)

Through a series of online and face-to-face activities, participants will explore the following provocations:

  • What are the necessary mandates for contemporary art biennales in this next era of international engagement?
  • What is/can be your position of engagement or disruption with contemporary art biennales?

A diverse group of 19 emerging creative and cultural workers from across Australia have been announced as participants of the Australia Council Biennale Delegates Program.

The program’s theme is ‘re(situate)’ and will focus on unpacking different biennale engagement approaches within an Australian and regional context. The participants will connect with artists and teams presenting the 59th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, Hawaiʻi Triennial, Documenta 15 and The Biennale of Sydney.

Learn more

An online gathering in January 2022 will launch the program. Participants will then engage in online labs between March and May 2022, featuring invited national and international creative practioners. These labs will allow participants to have conversations on learnings and approaches to practice, they will be a place for process driven discussions

The program will end with a face-to-face residency in NSW, Australia in June 2022. The residency will allow participants to develop an outcome that they can share with the re(situate) cohort and sector peers.

You will need to commit to ten days of engagement with the program between January, and March through to June 2022.

Participants will co-design program activities with the Australia Council and industry facilitators. To support the co-design of program activities applicants must nominate a maximum of three focus areas:

Self-determined First Nations conversations on international visual arts practice.

This focus area is for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants only.

Exploring the approaches to global diasporic perspectives within contemporary visual arts practice.

Establishing links and meetings with independent and collective arts spaces across bienniale models.

Exposure to international arts criticism approaches, networks and platforms.

Inclusive and emergent models of audience engagement.

Approaches to seeking philanthropic support for contemporary art events.

Mentorship for technical producers interested in delivering major international exhibitions.

International digital arts practice.

This program is for creative and cultural workers who:

  • are early-career – within five to ten years of practice.
  • are interested in implementing change in arts practice towards methodologies that embed reciprocity, sustainability and connection.
  • want to develop and expand their connections and understanding of significant international contemporary art platforms.
  • want to respond to shared global challenges to benefit Australian creative practice and approach to international engagement.
  • wish to identify future international projects or collaborations.

We encourage applications from the full spectrum of the visual arts industry. This includes but is not limited to cultural producers, writers, technical producers, philanthropy coordinators, artists, engagement and community development and curators.

We recognise the privilege of international engagement can be inaccessible to people with lived experiences of marginalisation.

We are committed to providing a program that offers inclusive, self-determined and safe participation. We prioritise applications from First Nations peoples, culturally and linguistically diverse people, people with disability, LGBTIQA+ people, regionally based people and the intersections across these.

Focus areas that are nominated for First Nations peoples will be facilitated by First Nations industry facilitators to ensure sovereign and culturally safe participation. Non-indigenous participants will also be offered the opportunity to further develop their allyship skills to be able to empower and advocate for self-determined First Nations arts and cultural practice.

  • Successful applicants will receive a $2,500 micro-grant to facilitate a program outcome.

NSW residency support:

  • $1,000 to cover the cost of daily expenses for five days.
  • Reimbursement for a return economy flight if you are based interstate
  • Reimbursement for five nights of accommodation.
  • Participation insurance

Additional support needs including any accessibility support, interpreting and childcare will be provided on a case by case basis. We encourage you to speak to us about any specific access needs or support you may require to ensure you can equitably participate in this program.

The Biennale Delegates Program is a co-investment initiative with state and territory arts funding agencies. Thank you to the generous support of:

Create NSW, Creative Victoria, Culture and the Arts WA through Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries, Arts NT, Arts Tasmania, Arts Qld, Arts South Australia and artsACT.

Additional access support for successful applicants has been made possible through the generosity of the Cross Family Foundations.

You can apply if:

  • you are based in Australia
  • you are an Australian citizen or an Australian permanent resident or a New Zealand citizen with a special category visa
  • you are an individual.

You can’t apply if:

  • you have an overdue grant report to the Australia Council
  • you owe money to the Australia Council
  • you are an organisation.

Click on the ‘Apply Now’ button at the top of this page.

The application form requires you to nominate a minimum of one and a maximum of three focus areas from the list above and submit three support material items.

Support material items:

  1. A single page pdf file or a link to an audio file or a video file responding to the following two questions:
    • How will this program contribute to the development of your practice? (250 words maximum)
    • What do you wish to explore while participating in this program? (250 words maximum)

Audio and video submissions should be a maximum of three (3) minutes in length. Please upload audio or video submissions under the support material section of the application form. Audio and video format submissions are not mandatory but encouraged.

  1. A one page CV illustrating your work experience and involvement in relevant projects.
  2. A link or single page of one example of a project or activity you have completed or are working on that is relevant to the program.

Please refer to our How to apply page for further information and guidance on support material upload requirements.

Applications will be assessed by Australia Council staff and industry advisors with a final review by participating states and territories.

Council will assess applications against the following assessment criteria:

  • Relevance: The timeliness and impact of the program for the applicant.
  • Leadership: An active and/or reflective approach to Australian and international visual arts practice and/or sector development.

Assessments will be completed in a two step process:

  • Stage 1: Internal shortlist by Australia Council staff
  • Stage 2: Final selection with states and territories and industry advisors

Notification: End November 2021

Clothilde Bullen

Clothilde Bullen is a Wardandi (Nyoongar) and Badimaya (Yamatji) curator who is currently the Senior Curator, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Collections and Exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia. Clothilde is the Chair of the Board of the National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA), and is a current Board member for the Australian charter of the International Association for Art Critics. She is also a Museums and Histories Board member for Create NSW and is an Alumni member of the British Council Accelerate Scholarship for Indigenous Leadership in the Arts.


Angie Abdilla

Angie Abdilla is a Palawa/Trawlwoolway woman based in Sydney. She founded Old Ways, New in 2016, and created the methodology, Country Centered Design, to support working with Indigenous knowledges and systems in the design of places, experiences and deep technologies. As a consultant, she works as a designer and as a published researcher, she presents on topics such as Indigenous design in the built environment and human technology interrelations in places such as the United Nations. Angie co-founded the international Indigenous Protocols and Artificial Intelligence working group (IP//AI) and is an Advisor for Woman in AI.


Léuli Eshrāghi

Léuli Eshrāghi is a Sāmoan/Persian/Cantonese interdisciplinary artist, writer, curator and researcher working between Australia and Canada. Ia/they intervene in display territories to centre global Indigenous and Asian diasporic visuality, sensual and spoken languages, and ceremonial-political practices. Through performance, moving image, writing and installation, la/they engage with Indigenous futurities as haunted by ongoing militourist and missionary violences that once erased faʻafafine-faʻatane people from kinship and knowledge structures. Ia/they contribute to growing international critical practice across the Great Ocean and North America through residencies, exhibitions, publications, courses and rights advocacy


Neha Kale

Neha Kale is a widely published writer, journalist and critic.  She has been writing about art and contemporary culture for over a decade and her essays, criticism, features and reportage have appeared in mainstream and independent Australian and international publications. Neha has participated and featured in many festivals and cultural programs. She was formerly editor and editor-at-large of VAULT magazine.


Khaled Sabsabi

Khaled Sabsabi is an artist who migrated with his family to Australia in 1978 following the outbreak of civil war in Lebanon. They settled in Western Sydney, where Sabsabi now lives and works. Since the late 1980s Sabsabi has worked with communities, particularly those in Western Sydney, to create and develop arts programs and projects that explore the complexities of place, displacement, identity and ideological differences associated with migrant experiences and marginalisation. He see’s art as an effective tool to communicate with people, through a familiar language.

Australia Pavilion Invigilation Program – Venice Biennale 2022

About the program

The Australia Council Biennale Delegates Program is a professional development opportunity for individuals based in Australia. The 2022 theme is re(situate), an offer to refocus and reposition as we step into this next era in international engagement within the visual arts.

The program will facilitate exchange of ideas, catalyse new perspectives and support the seeding of future projects and collaborations. This edition will counterpoint the prevailing legacies of foundational biennale models with emergent and regionally specific modes of practice tethered to the Asia Pacific region.

Participants will connect to:

  • 59th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia (online)
  • Hawaiʻi Triennial (online)
  • Documenta 15 (online)
  • The Biennale of Sydney (face-to-face)

Through a series of online and face-to-face activities, participants will explore the following provocations:

  • What are the necessary mandates for contemporary art biennales in this next era of international engagement?
  • What is/can be your position of engagement or disruption with contemporary art biennales?

A diverse group of 19 emerging creative and cultural workers from across Australia have been announced as participants of the Australia Council Biennale Delegates Program.

The program’s theme is ‘re(situate)’ and will focus on unpacking different biennale engagement approaches within an Australian and regional context. The participants will connect with artists and teams presenting the 59th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, Hawaiʻi Triennial, Documenta 15 and The Biennale of Sydney.

Learn more

An online gathering in January 2022 will launch the program. Participants will then engage in online labs between March and May 2022, featuring invited national and international creative practioners. These labs will allow participants to have conversations on learnings and approaches to practice, they will be a place for process driven discussions

The program will end with a face-to-face residency in NSW, Australia in June 2022. The residency will allow participants to develop an outcome that they can share with the re(situate) cohort and sector peers.

You will need to commit to ten days of engagement with the program between January, and March through to June 2022.

Participants will co-design program activities with the Australia Council and industry facilitators. To support the co-design of program activities applicants must nominate a maximum of three focus areas:

Self-determined First Nations conversations on international visual arts practice.

This focus area is for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants only.

Exploring the approaches to global diasporic perspectives within contemporary visual arts practice.

Establishing links and meetings with independent and collective arts spaces across bienniale models.

Exposure to international arts criticism approaches, networks and platforms.

Inclusive and emergent models of audience engagement.

Approaches to seeking philanthropic support for contemporary art events.

Mentorship for technical producers interested in delivering major international exhibitions.

International digital arts practice.

This program is for creative and cultural workers who:

  • are early-career – within five to ten years of practice.
  • are interested in implementing change in arts practice towards methodologies that embed reciprocity, sustainability and connection.
  • want to develop and expand their connections and understanding of significant international contemporary art platforms.
  • want to respond to shared global challenges to benefit Australian creative practice and approach to international engagement.
  • wish to identify future international projects or collaborations.

We encourage applications from the full spectrum of the visual arts industry. This includes but is not limited to cultural producers, writers, technical producers, philanthropy coordinators, artists, engagement and community development and curators.

We recognise the privilege of international engagement can be inaccessible to people with lived experiences of marginalisation.

We are committed to providing a program that offers inclusive, self-determined and safe participation. We prioritise applications from First Nations peoples, culturally and linguistically diverse people, people with disability, LGBTIQA+ people, regionally based people and the intersections across these.

Focus areas that are nominated for First Nations peoples will be facilitated by First Nations industry facilitators to ensure sovereign and culturally safe participation. Non-indigenous participants will also be offered the opportunity to further develop their allyship skills to be able to empower and advocate for self-determined First Nations arts and cultural practice.

  • Successful applicants will receive a $2,500 micro-grant to facilitate a program outcome.

NSW residency support:

  • $1,000 to cover the cost of daily expenses for five days.
  • Reimbursement for a return economy flight if you are based interstate
  • Reimbursement for five nights of accommodation.
  • Participation insurance

Additional support needs including any accessibility support, interpreting and childcare will be provided on a case by case basis. We encourage you to speak to us about any specific access needs or support you may require to ensure you can equitably participate in this program.

The Biennale Delegates Program is a co-investment initiative with state and territory arts funding agencies. Thank you to the generous support of:

Create NSW, Creative Victoria, Culture and the Arts WA through Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries, Arts NT, Arts Tasmania, Arts Qld, Arts South Australia and artsACT.

Additional access support for successful applicants has been made possible through the generosity of the Cross Family Foundations.

You can apply if:

  • you are based in Australia
  • you are an Australian citizen or an Australian permanent resident or a New Zealand citizen with a special category visa
  • you are an individual.

You can’t apply if:

  • you have an overdue grant report to the Australia Council
  • you owe money to the Australia Council
  • you are an organisation.

Click on the ‘Apply Now’ button at the top of this page.

The application form requires you to nominate a minimum of one and a maximum of three focus areas from the list above and submit three support material items.

Support material items:

  1. A single page pdf file or a link to an audio file or a video file responding to the following two questions:
    • How will this program contribute to the development of your practice? (250 words maximum)
    • What do you wish to explore while participating in this program? (250 words maximum)

Audio and video submissions should be a maximum of three (3) minutes in length. Please upload audio or video submissions under the support material section of the application form. Audio and video format submissions are not mandatory but encouraged.

  1. A one page CV illustrating your work experience and involvement in relevant projects.
  2. A link or single page of one example of a project or activity you have completed or are working on that is relevant to the program.

Please refer to our How to apply page for further information and guidance on support material upload requirements.

Applications will be assessed by Australia Council staff and industry advisors with a final review by participating states and territories.

Council will assess applications against the following assessment criteria:

  • Relevance: The timeliness and impact of the program for the applicant.
  • Leadership: An active and/or reflective approach to Australian and international visual arts practice and/or sector development.

Assessments will be completed in a two step process:

  • Stage 1: Internal shortlist by Australia Council staff
  • Stage 2: Final selection with states and territories and industry advisors

Notification: End November 2021

Clothilde Bullen

Clothilde Bullen is a Wardandi (Nyoongar) and Badimaya (Yamatji) curator who is currently the Senior Curator, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Collections and Exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia. Clothilde is the Chair of the Board of the National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA), and is a current Board member for the Australian charter of the International Association for Art Critics. She is also a Museums and Histories Board member for Create NSW and is an Alumni member of the British Council Accelerate Scholarship for Indigenous Leadership in the Arts.


Angie Abdilla

Angie Abdilla is a Palawa/Trawlwoolway woman based in Sydney. She founded Old Ways, New in 2016, and created the methodology, Country Centered Design, to support working with Indigenous knowledges and systems in the design of places, experiences and deep technologies. As a consultant, she works as a designer and as a published researcher, she presents on topics such as Indigenous design in the built environment and human technology interrelations in places such as the United Nations. Angie co-founded the international Indigenous Protocols and Artificial Intelligence working group (IP//AI) and is an Advisor for Woman in AI.


Léuli Eshrāghi

Léuli Eshrāghi is a Sāmoan/Persian/Cantonese interdisciplinary artist, writer, curator and researcher working between Australia and Canada. Ia/they intervene in display territories to centre global Indigenous and Asian diasporic visuality, sensual and spoken languages, and ceremonial-political practices. Through performance, moving image, writing and installation, la/they engage with Indigenous futurities as haunted by ongoing militourist and missionary violences that once erased faʻafafine-faʻatane people from kinship and knowledge structures. Ia/they contribute to growing international critical practice across the Great Ocean and North America through residencies, exhibitions, publications, courses and rights advocacy


Neha Kale

Neha Kale is a widely published writer, journalist and critic.  She has been writing about art and contemporary culture for over a decade and her essays, criticism, features and reportage have appeared in mainstream and independent Australian and international publications. Neha has participated and featured in many festivals and cultural programs. She was formerly editor and editor-at-large of VAULT magazine.


Khaled Sabsabi

Khaled Sabsabi is an artist who migrated with his family to Australia in 1978 following the outbreak of civil war in Lebanon. They settled in Western Sydney, where Sabsabi now lives and works. Since the late 1980s Sabsabi has worked with communities, particularly those in Western Sydney, to create and develop arts programs and projects that explore the complexities of place, displacement, identity and ideological differences associated with migrant experiences and marginalisation. He see’s art as an effective tool to communicate with people, through a familiar language.

Frequently asked questions

Manage the Pavilion Attendants

  • Manage the diverse team of Pavilion Attendants (PA) including:
    • supervision and coordination of the PA roster
    • delivering and delegating daily priorities such as cleaning and maintenance
    • human resource topics, including wellbeing and safety, with the support of the Pavilion Supervisor and the Australia Council project team
  • Encourage the PAs to use this opportunity to network and connect with other national pavilions.

Reporting and risk management.

  • Provide a detailed weekly report, including risk management and accurately recorded visitor numbers, to the Australia Council project team.
  • This role reports to the Project Manager, Venice Biennale on all matters. Maintain clear and ongoing communications in relation to all aspects of exhibition monitoring, visitor attendance, the Pavilion invigilation team, and media issues including escalating urgent issues as required.

Manage the exhibition in the Australian Pavilion

  • Monitor and check the security and technical operability of the exhibition artworks and venue on a daily basis.
  • Coordinate the opening and closing of the Australian Pavilion, within the appointed Giardini opening hours.
  • Maintain clear and ongoing communications with the Pavilion Supervisor regarding exhibition monitoring and security, venue maintenance, any staffing changes or human resource requirements.
  • Facilitate and action requests from the Artistic team and Australia Council project team.
  • Coordinate petty cash and keep detailed financial records.

Audience engagement

  • Research and communicate the practice and importance of Marco Fusinato’s work, and Australian contemporary visual arts, to an international audience.
  • Coordinate the public program with the Artistic team and Australia Council project team.
  • Maintain a consistently high level of service to a large volume of visiting public, while ensuring the security and invigilation of the exhibition and the Australian Pavilion.
  • Provide information on the exhibition and Australian visual arts and when required, provide walk-throughs of the exhibition to VIPs
  • Act as an ambassador for Australia by positively represent Australian culture to visitors and stakeholders at all times.
  • Edit and upload engaging content for the Australia Council’s social media platforms.
  • Abide by the Council’s social media protocols and communication and marketing strategy.

General

  • Work five days a week in the Australian Pavilion for a maximum of six (6) hours a day reporting directly to the Attendant Manager (AM).
  • Maintain clear and ongoing communications with the AM.
  • Establish daily priorities with the Attendant Manager including:
    • day-to-day exhibition and venue cleaning and maintenance
    • timely opening and closing of the Australian pavilion
    • leading tours, and
    • front of house presentation
  • Support the Attendant Manager to organise and host a monthly networking event with your team and attendants from other national pavilions.
  • Undertake other duties as required by the Attendant Manager, Pavilion Supervisor, and the Australia Council project team.

Coordinate the exhibition in the Australian Pavilion

  • Maintain clear and ongoing communications with the AM in Venice regarding exhibition security and monitoring of the exhibition artworks, venue, and technology on a daily basis.
  • Facilitate and action requests from the Artistic team and Australia Council project team.

Audience Engagement

  • Provide a high-level and welcoming service to visitors including providing information on the artworks and Australian visual arts.
  • Act as an ambassador for Australia by positively representing Australian culture to visitors and stakeholders at all times.
  • Strive to position the Australian Pavilion as a destination and a ‘must see’ exhibition at the Venice Biennale.
  • As directed by the AM, create, edit and upload engaging content for the Australia Council’s online communication channels. Abide by the Council’s social media protocols and communication and marketing strategy.

Reporting

  • Research exhibiting artist Marco Fusinato practice and familiarise yourself with the central themes of his work.
  • Accurately record visitor statistics for the Australian Pavilion.
  • Submit responses to a feedback survey to the Australia Council at the end of your rotation.

Experimenter Curators Hub

DISCUSSION AND DEBATE OF CURATORIAL PRACTICES ACROSS THE WORLD

Experimenter Curators’ Hub is an annual platform in developing and sustaining discourse on curatorial practice and exhibition-making through critical discussion and debate in Kolkata, India. Structured as a deeply intensive 3-day program, every year the hub invites some of the foremost curators of the world to present their practice with reference to recent exhibitions curated by them. The audience at Experimenter Curators’ Hub plays an active role in this exchange and contributes significantly to the conversations. The final day ends with a moderated panel discussion with all the participating curators, reflecting on the key aspects that emerged over the three days.

Experimenter co-founders and powerhouse couple Prateek and Priyanka Raja share sentiments of their vision: “The Experimenter Curators’ Hub was organised out of a crucial need to critically discuss and debate curatorial practices across the world, to learn, converse and thereby possibly throw open possibilities of understanding what lies behind significant contemporary exhibition-making. The ECH is a unique setting that allows for a certain intimacy, letting curators open up in a way that no other forum allows. The intimateness of the conversations and the possibilities that emerge from some of the most fertile minds in the world of contemporary art is palpable. The energy in the room augments criticism and theory as a starting ground.”

The Australia Council is thrilled to facilitate the participation of Australian Curator of South Asian heritage Tarun Nagesh at the 9th Experimenter Curators’ Hub in November 2019, following the success of the hugely ambitious 9th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT9).

The Australia Council will also support the live stream of The Hub, breaking down traditional constraints of location and opening up the debate to people around the world. Online audiences will have the chance to interact with, and question the curators in real time.



Tarun Nagesh

Tarun Nagesh is Curator of Asian Art at the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) in Brisbane, Australia. He is part of the lead curatorial team of the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT), primarily working with artists in South and South East Asia for the 7th, 8th and 9th editions. Tarun also regularly curates exhibitions for QAGOMA, including recent projects Problem-Wisdom: Thai Art in the 1990s; A Fleeting Bloom: Japanese Art from the Collection; KalpaVriksha: Contemporary Indigenous and Vernacular Art of India (as part of APT8); and Indo Pop: Contemporary Indonesian Art.

Tarun is actively involved in commissions and acquisitions for the QAGOMA collection and also oversees QAGOMA’s historical Asian Art collection and exhibitions. He is a regular contributor to journals and exhibition publications in Australia, is a state representative of the The Asian Arts Society of Australia, a member of the national Asian Art Provenance Research panel, and was a curatorial fellow of the 2018 Dhaka Art Summit. Prior to joining QAGOMA in 2011 Tarun worked in the commercial sector in Melbourne.

“It is a great honour to be invited to the Curator’s Hub, and finally make a trip to Experimenter, Kolkata. It is long overdue. I’m very familiar with this wonderful initiative as many friends have participated and I’ve watched multiple videos in the past (and always wanted to attend!). I’m thrilled to be part of the Curators’ Hub – it really is a great honour.”


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Blue Cabin

A VISION FOR A FLOATING ARTIST RESIDENCY

Originally built in 1927 as a floating house in Coal Harbour, Canada, the Blue Cabin was re-located to North Vancouver for more than 80 years.

In its inaugural year as an open house for artists in residence, five artists will examine local histories and resurgent Indigenous traditions from Canada and Australia

Australian First Nations artist Vicki Couzens will be the first Australian artist to undertake the residency, as part of an Australia Council partnership with Grunt gallery, Other Sights for Artists’ Projects, and Creative Cultural Collaborations (C3).

“We are delighted to support the first Australian artist in the Blue Cabin Floating Artist Residency program,” says Dr. Wendy Were, Executive Director, Strategic Development and Advocacy at the Australia Council for the Arts. “Vicki Couzens is a First Nations multimedia artist and cultural leader who will share her arts practice and cultural knowledge in a unique and culturally significant location. This prestigious opportunity ensures that Australia’s highly respected First Nations’ arts, culture, and stories continue to be shared with new audiences across the world, and strengthens our deep connections between Australian and Canadian First Nations peoples.”



Vicki Couzens

Possum Cloak Maker, Interdisciplinary Artist, Blue Cabin artist in residency

Vicki has worked in the Aboriginal community for more than 35 years in various roles, serving on the Boards of Banmirra Aboriginal Arts, Victorian Housing, Koorie Heritage Trust and the Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages (VACL). She was Language Advisor and worked with the curatorial team on the First Peoples Exhibition at Melbourne Museum and has taught extensively across Victoria and south-eastern Australia.

She is considered a Senior Knowledge Holder of Language and Possum Cloak Story. Vicki is proud that her father, senior Gunditjmara Elder Ivan Couzens, served Aboriginal communities for more than 45 years at local, state and national levels, and established the first Dictionary of the Gunditjmara Languages in 1996. Vicki said: “Dad is my Elder, my mentor and my inspiration – he is a gentle, humble, wise man and I aspire to be more like him.”


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GALLERY

TPAM – Performing Arts Meeting In Yokohama

About the opportunity

Applications are now open for support to attend the Performing Arts Meeting in Yokohama (TPAM), Japan, 2020.  

TPAM is one of the most established and influential performing arts platforms in Asia; a space where people from various places in the world who are professionally involved in performing arts get together for exchange through diverse performance and meeting programs that take place under the TPAM umbrella. The focus for the 2020 platform will be on dance in Asia. 

The Australia Council’s International Development Manager – North Asia, will work with the delegation in Yokohama. 

Australia Council support will provide delegates with $2,500 each towards the cost of travel. Delegates will be responsible for all costs associated with attending the meeting including flights, visas, insurance, accommodation and registration. 

Please check the general eligibility requirements on the Australia Council website. 

Applicants are required to respond to the following selection criteria: 

  1. The impact of the project in developing future opportunities in Japan and enhancing your reputation in Japan. 
  2. Demonstrated understanding of, and commitment to, the region and market. 
  3. The timeliness of this opportunity and a demonstrated ability to plan and deliver on any outcomes in Japan that may arise. 

The Australia Council encourages applications from applicants who identify as First Nations, from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people with disability, and people living in regional and remote areas.  

The Australia Council’s programs and processes are designed for accessibility and best use by a diverse demographic. We work with individual applicants to find the best approach to accommodating access, childcare, carer and other support needs. Please contact us at least 2 weeks prior to the closing date to discuss your access and support requirements. 

No supporting material or submitted budget is required. Please note that applicants will be unable to attach supporting material to your online application. 

Australia Council staff will consider applications according to the selection criteria above and will seek recommendations by industry advisors as needed. 

You will be informed of the outcome of your application by late September 2019. 

The way Australia Council grants payments are made has changed. Effective immediately, grant recipients will no longer send an invoice for payment of a grant. Instead, after you accept our offer of funding, we will pay your grant into your nominated bank account and send you a Recipient Created Tax Invoice (RCTI).

Important information for administered grants

If you plan to have your grant administered by a third party, applicants will now need to ensure that the administrator is registered on the Australia Council online system before you begin your application. This means you cannot complete or submit an application if your administrator is not registered.

Click on the ‘Apply now’ button at the bottom of this page. Applications must be submitted via the Australia Council’s online system. 

Note, applications to International Development funding opportunities do not count as an application to the Australia Council Grants Program. 

If you are applying as an organisation, please specify the staff member(s) who will participate in this activity as part of your application. If this changes, please notify us as early as possible as this may affect the status of your application. 

TPAM – Performing Arts Meeting In Yokohama

About the opportunity

Applications are now open for support to attend the Performing Arts Meeting in Yokohama (TPAM), Japan, 2020.  

TPAM is one of the most established and influential performing arts platforms in Asia; a space where people from various places in the world who are professionally involved in performing arts get together for exchange through diverse performance and meeting programs that take place under the TPAM umbrella. The focus for the 2020 platform will be on dance in Asia. 

The Australia Council’s International Development Manager – North Asia, will work with the delegation in Yokohama. 

Australia Council support will provide delegates with $2,500 each towards the cost of travel. Delegates will be responsible for all costs associated with attending the meeting including flights, visas, insurance, accommodation and registration. 

Please check the general eligibility requirements on the Australia Council website. 

Applicants are required to respond to the following selection criteria: 

  1. The impact of the project in developing future opportunities in Japan and enhancing your reputation in Japan. 
  2. Demonstrated understanding of, and commitment to, the region and market. 
  3. The timeliness of this opportunity and a demonstrated ability to plan and deliver on any outcomes in Japan that may arise. 

The Australia Council encourages applications from applicants who identify as First Nations, from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people with disability, and people living in regional and remote areas.  

The Australia Council’s programs and processes are designed for accessibility and best use by a diverse demographic. We work with individual applicants to find the best approach to accommodating access, childcare, carer and other support needs. Please contact us at least 2 weeks prior to the closing date to discuss your access and support requirements. 

No supporting material or submitted budget is required. Please note that applicants will be unable to attach supporting material to your online application. 

Australia Council staff will consider applications according to the selection criteria above and will seek recommendations by industry advisors as needed. 

You will be informed of the outcome of your application by late September 2019. 

The way Australia Council grants payments are made has changed. Effective immediately, grant recipients will no longer send an invoice for payment of a grant. Instead, after you accept our offer of funding, we will pay your grant into your nominated bank account and send you a Recipient Created Tax Invoice (RCTI).

Important information for administered grants

If you plan to have your grant administered by a third party, applicants will now need to ensure that the administrator is registered on the Australia Council online system before you begin your application. This means you cannot complete or submit an application if your administrator is not registered.

Click on the ‘Apply now’ button at the bottom of this page. Applications must be submitted via the Australia Council’s online system. 

Note, applications to International Development funding opportunities do not count as an application to the Australia Council Grants Program. 

If you are applying as an organisation, please specify the staff member(s) who will participate in this activity as part of your application. If this changes, please notify us as early as possible as this may affect the status of your application. 

TPAM – Performing Arts Meeting In Yokohama

About the opportunity

Applications are now open for support to attend the Performing Arts Meeting in Yokohama (TPAM), Japan, 2020.  

TPAM is one of the most established and influential performing arts platforms in Asia; a space where people from various places in the world who are professionally involved in performing arts get together for exchange through diverse performance and meeting programs that take place under the TPAM umbrella. The focus for the 2020 platform will be on dance in Asia. 

The Australia Council’s International Development Manager – North Asia, will work with the delegation in Yokohama. 

Australia Council support will provide delegates with $2,500 each towards the cost of travel. Delegates will be responsible for all costs associated with attending the meeting including flights, visas, insurance, accommodation and registration. 

Please check the general eligibility requirements on the Australia Council website. 

Applicants are required to respond to the following selection criteria: 

  1. The impact of the project in developing future opportunities in Japan and enhancing your reputation in Japan. 
  2. Demonstrated understanding of, and commitment to, the region and market. 
  3. The timeliness of this opportunity and a demonstrated ability to plan and deliver on any outcomes in Japan that may arise. 

The Australia Council encourages applications from applicants who identify as First Nations, from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people with disability, and people living in regional and remote areas.  

The Australia Council’s programs and processes are designed for accessibility and best use by a diverse demographic. We work with individual applicants to find the best approach to accommodating access, childcare, carer and other support needs. Please contact us at least 2 weeks prior to the closing date to discuss your access and support requirements. 

No supporting material or submitted budget is required. Please note that applicants will be unable to attach supporting material to your online application. 

Australia Council staff will consider applications according to the selection criteria above and will seek recommendations by industry advisors as needed. 

You will be informed of the outcome of your application by late September 2019. 

The way Australia Council grants payments are made has changed. Effective immediately, grant recipients will no longer send an invoice for payment of a grant. Instead, after you accept our offer of funding, we will pay your grant into your nominated bank account and send you a Recipient Created Tax Invoice (RCTI).

Important information for administered grants

If you plan to have your grant administered by a third party, applicants will now need to ensure that the administrator is registered on the Australia Council online system before you begin your application. This means you cannot complete or submit an application if your administrator is not registered.

Click on the ‘Apply now’ button at the bottom of this page. Applications must be submitted via the Australia Council’s online system. 

Note, applications to International Development funding opportunities do not count as an application to the Australia Council Grants Program. 

If you are applying as an organisation, please specify the staff member(s) who will participate in this activity as part of your application. If this changes, please notify us as early as possible as this may affect the status of your application. 

Eligibility

You can only submit one application to this closing date for Arts Projects – Organisations.

Only organisations may apply to this category.

Organisations that provide a service to the arts are welcome to apply. International organisations can apply for projects that benefit practicing Australian artists, their work or Australian audiences.

Applications for funding to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander panel must come from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations.

You can’t apply for a grant if:

  • you have already submitted an application to this closing date for Arts Projects – Organisations
  • you have an overdue grant report
  • you owe money to the Australia Council
  • you are an individual or group
  • you receive funding through the National Performing Arts Partnership Framework
  • you will receive multi-year investment via the Four Year Funding program from 2021 to 2024.

We fund a range of activities, for example:

  • professional skills development, including mentoring and residencies
  • the creation of new work
  • practice based research
  • creative development
  • experimentation
  • collaborations
  • touring
  • festivals
  • productions
  • exhibitions
  • performances
  • publishing
  • recording
  • activities to develop the arts sector
  • promotion and marketing
  • market development activity
  • activities that creatively engage communities.

You can’t apply for the following activity:

  • projects or activities that do not involve or benefit Australian practicing artists or arts professionals
  • projects or activities that do not have a clearly defined arts component
  • projects that have already taken place.

Once you submit your application, we will send you an email acknowledging receipt of your application.

After you submit your application, we first check it meets the eligibility criteria for the grant or opportunity to which you are applying.

Applications to the Australia Council Grant Programs are assessed by arts practice peer panels against the published assessment criteria for the relevant grant program.

We aim to notify you of the outcome of your application no later than 12 weeks after the published closing date for the applicable grant round.

 

The Australia Council also offers a variety of other grants and opportunities which are not assessed in the same way. Please refer the guidelines for the relevant grant or opportunity to find out how it is assessed.

Useful links

For FAQ’s relating to the grants model, please click here.

Please contact the Artists Services team.

Kyoto Art Center
Residency Exchange

Ross Manning, Kyoto Art Center Residency Exchange 2019 resident.​ Credit: Michelle Manning

 

About the opportunity

The Australia Council for the Arts – in partnership with Kyoto Art Center – is offering an Australian visual artist the chance to live and work in Kyoto, Japan, as part of a residency exchange program.

In 2020, one Australian visual artist will experience a two-month studio residency at Kyoto Art Center, a multi-art form venue in Kyoto. Kyoto Art Center houses a number of performance halls, exhibition spaces and artists’ studios, and acts as a hub for visual arts and dance organisations in Kyoto and across Asia. Residents at Kyoto Art Center work alongside other international and Japanese artists and can engage in local cultural activities, such as tea ceremonies, traditional performances and workshops.

This residency is suitable for visual artists with interdisciplinary practices.

The selected Australian artist will have access to a studio inside Kyoto Art Center, and separate accommodation at a private apartment, located 10 minutes walk from the Center. The Australia Council will award the selected artist a $7,500 grant as living and travel allowance.

In a reciprocal arrangement, a Japanese artist selected by Kyoto Art Center will travel to Australia, where they will live and work in residence at Artspace, Sydney.

Current resident: Jenna Lee

Jenna Lee

Jenna Lee

Jenna Lee is a Gulumerridjin (Larrakia), Wardaman and Karra Jarri Saltwater woman with mixed Japanese, Chinese, Filipino and Anglo-Australian ancestry. Using art to explore and celebrate her many overlapping identities, Lee works across sculpture, installation, and body adornment. She also works with the moving image, photography and projection in the digital medium.

With a practice focused on materiality and ancestral material culture, Lee works with notions of the archive, histories of colonial collecting, and settler-colonial books and texts. Lee ritualistically analyses, deconstructs, and reconstructs source material, language and books, transforming them into new forms of cultural beauty and pride, and presenting a tangibly translated book.

Driven to create work in which she, her family, and the broader mixed First Nations community see themselves represented, Lee builds on a foundation of her father’s teachings of culture and her mother’s teachings of papercraft.

Represented by MARS Gallery in Naarm (Melbourne, Australia).

Image credit: Jade Florence.

Please check the general eligibility requirements  on the Australia Council website.

Applications will be assessed by the Australia Council, in consultation with Kyoto Art Center and industry advisors, against the following selection criteria.

  • quality of work previously produced
  • artistic merit
  • ability, skills and creative thinking that suggests strong artistic potential
  • public or peer response to work previously produced.
  • the skills and artistic ability of the people involved and their relevance to the proposed activity
  • realistic and achievable planning, resource use and evaluation
  • the role of any partners involved, including confirmation of their involvement
  • proposals which involve working with diverse audiences or communities, peers will look for demonstrated cultural competencies and appropriateness.
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your artistic practice
  • the relevance and timeliness of the proposed activity
  • how the proposed activity enables you to discover and develop new markets, or meet existing market demand
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your capacity as an arts professional.

The Australia Council encourages applications from applicants who identify as First Nations, from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people with disability, and people living in regional and remote areas.

The Australia Council’s programs and processes are designed for accessibility and best use by a diverse demographic. We work with individual applicants to find the best approach to accommodating access, childcare, carer and other support needs. Please contact us at least 2 weeks prior to the closing date to discuss your access and support requirements.

Additional material can be submitted to help support your application, including artist biographies, letters of support, additional written material, images, and video footage of previous work. Support material may help the assessors gain an understanding of the quality of your work, and where relevant, the skills and role of other artists or partners involved.

You are not required to submit a budget with your application.

To find out more about support material, including advice on how to get examples of your work online, click here.

Our preferred method of receiving support material is via URLs. However, if you cannot supply artistic support material via a URL, we will accept artistic support material in the following formats:

  • video (MP4, QuickTime, and Windows Media)
  • audio (MP3 and Windows Media)
  • images (JPEG and PowerPoint)
  • written material (Word and PDF)

Australia Council Staff, in consultation with Kyoto Art Center will consider applications according to the selection criteria above and will seek recommendations by industry advisors as needed.

You will be informed of the outcome of your application by late-December 2019.

The way Australia Council grants payments are made has changed. Effective immediately, grant recipients will no longer send an invoice for payment of a grant. Instead, after you accept our offer of funding, we will pay your grant into your nominated bank account and send you a Recipient Created Tax Invoice (RCTI).

If you plan to have your grant administered by a third party, applicants will now need to ensure that the administrator is registered on the Australia Council online system before you begin your application. This means you cannot complete or submit an application if your administrator is not registered.

Click on the ‘Apply now’ button at the bottom of this page. Applications must be submitted via the Australia Council’s online system.

Note, applications to International Development funding opportunities do not count as an application to the Australia Council Grants Program.

If you are applying as an organisation, please specify the staff member(s) who will participate in this activity as part of your application. If this changes, please notify us as early as possible as this may affect the status of your application.

2020 (postponed to 2022)

  • Jenna Lee

2019

  •  Ross Manning

2018

  •  Gerwyn Davies

Keesing Studio residency at the Cité internationale des arts

A residency opportunity for Australian writers in Paris

Image: view from the 5th floor walkway of the Cité internationale des arts – Site du Marais / Photo by Maurine Tric, Adagp 2022, for the Cité internationale des arts

About the residency

The Keesing Studio residency at the Cité internationale des arts is an opportunity for writers to direct their own program of activity and expand their practice and networks. There are three residencies on offer: one month (with $5,000 support), and two x three month (with $10,000 support).

The Studio was generously leased in 1985 for 75 years by the late Nancy Keesing to provide Australian writers with the opportunity to live and write in a new and stimulating environment. The Cité provides studio space to professional artists wanting to develop their practice in France. Every month, in partnership with 135 French and international organisations, the Cité’s two complementary sites welcome more than 300 artists from a wide range of disciplines for residencies lasting up to one year.

The diverse range of artists in residence at any one time allows for rich artistic conversations and potential for collaborations. The Cité has a vast network of contacts in Paris and wider France and can assist artists in developing their networks in France. The Cité also organises a program of open studios throughout the year.

Resources to help strengthen your application and maximise your residency experience can be found here.

Information pack: Download PDF.

Who can apply?

  • Only individuals may apply to this category.
  • You must be a practicing artist or arts worker and an Australian citizen or an Australian permanent resident.

Who cannot apply

You cannot apply if:

  • You received a grant, or administered a grant, from the Australia Council in the past and that grant has not been satisfactorily acquitted
  • You owe money to the Australia Council
  • We will not accept applications from legally constituted organisations.

Australia Council staff will consider applications according to the assessment criteria and will seek recommendations by industry advisors as needed. Successful applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by mid December 2022.

Applicants must address the following assessment criteria:

  1. Artistic merit
  • suitability of your practice to the residency program and its artistic environment/offer
  • quality of work previously produced, and public and peer response to your work
  1. Viability
  • suitability of your proposal to the residency program
  • the skills and artistic ability of your collaborators and their relevance to the proposed activity
  • realistic and achievable planning, resource use and evaluation.
  1. Impact on career
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your artistic practice
  • the relevance and timeliness of the proposed activity
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your capacity as an arts professional, particularly in relation to international development and collaboration.

You should submit support material with your application. Assessors may review this support material to help them gain a better sense of your project.

What you should provide

We do not accept application-related support material submitted via post. Application-related material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your support material online, or need advice on what type of material to submit, please contact Ellen Dwyer, International Engagement Adviser, Europe on +61 02 9215 9051 or e.dwyer@australiacouncil.gov.au.

There are three types of support material you may submit:

1. Artistic support material

This should include relevant, recent examples of your artistic or cultural work.

Types of support material we accept

Our preferred method of receiving support material is via URLs (weblinks).

You can provide up to three URLs (weblinks) that link to content that is relevant to your proposal. This may include video, audio, images, or written material.

These URLs can include a total of:

  • 10 minutes of video and/or audio recording
  • 10 images
  • 10 pages of written material (for example, excerpts of literary writing).

Please note: Our assessors will not access any URLs that require them to log in or sign up to a platform. Please do not provide links to Spotify or other applications that require users to log in or pay for access.

If you are linking to media files that are private or password protected like Vimeo, please provide the password in the password field on the application form.

Other accepted file formats

If you cannot supply support material via URLs, you may upload support material to your application in the following formats:

  • video (MP4, QuickTime, and Windows Media)
  • audio (MP3 and Windows Media)
  • images (JPEG and PowerPoint)
  • written material (Word and PDF).

2. Biographies and CVs

You can include a brief bio or curriculum vitae (CV) for key artists, personnel or other collaborators involved in your project.

Brief bios or CV information should be presented as a single document no longer than two A4 pages in total.

3. Letters of support

Individuals, groups, or organisations can write letters in support of your project. A support letter should explain how the project or activity will benefit you, other artists or arts professionals, participants, or the broader community. It can also detail the support or involvement of key project partners, or evidence of consultation.

If relevant to your activity, letters of support must provide evidence of appropriate permissions and support from First Nations organisations, communities, and Elders. Please refer to the First Nations Protocols for more information.

You can include up to five letters of support, with each letter not exceeding one A4 page.

The Keesing Studio is in the Cité internationale des arts site in the Marais district.

The studio is on the first floor and approximately 30 sqm, comprising of one large room off an entry, with a partitioned sleeping area, and a small kitchen and bathroom. The furniture is basic, with a bed, bookcase, small table, chairs and a dresser. A larger table and easel may also be requested if necessary.

The Cité is centrally located on the rue Hotel de Ville, which runs beside the Seine, approximately four blocks from the Centre Pompidou, the Louvre, and the Picasso Museum. There are four gallery districts in Paris, all within walking distance of the Cité. Close by is Le Marais, an area with many museums, commercial galleries, cheap restaurants, and coffee shops. The Cité is across the Seine from the Ile de Cité, which is the oldest part of Paris. The nearest metro stops are Pont Marie and St Paul.

The Cité is within easy reach of many literary landmarks in Paris, including the city’s most vibrant bookshops and libraries. Residents are encouraged to make connections with these institutions on, or prior, to arrival to fully immerse themselves in the Paris literary scene.

The Cité’s studios are not wheelchair accessible. Additional access requirements during a residency may be accommodated on request.

The studio is suitable for a single artist or couple, but there is not the space to accommodate children.

Your application must comply with the following Protocols. We may contact you to request further information during the assessment process, or if successful, as a condition of your funding.

Protocols for using First Nations Cultural and Intellectual Property in the Arts

All applications involving First Nations artists, communities or subject matter must adhere to these Protocols, provide evidence of this in their application and support material. More information on the First Nations Protocols is available here.

Commonwealth Child Safe Framework

All successful applicants are required to comply with all Australian law relating to employing or engaging people who work or volunteer with children, including working with children checks and mandatory reporting. Successful organisations who provide services directly to children, or whose funded activities involve contact with children, will additionally be required to implement the National Principles for Child Safe Organisations.

2020-2021

  • Yassmin Abdel-Magied
  • Kate Cole-Adams
  • Eloise Grills

2019-2020

  • Kevin Brophy
  • Justine Ettler

2018-2019

  • Gregory Mackay
  • Madeleine O’Dea

2017-2018

  • Michelle Wright
  • Wayne McCauley

Frequently Asked Questions

Unless stated otherwise in the program description, all residencies are offered for fixed dates and periods of time.

Yes, but this will be at your own cost and the Australia Council will not be able to provide additional funds towards the extension.

No. You are not required to provide a budget with your application.

There is no requirement for you to provide a timetable of your activities, unless stated otherwise in the individual residency program guidelines.

Yes. If successful, you are required to take out travel insurance for the duration of your residency. It is recommended you pay for this from your grant.

The capacity to accommodate children and partners varies for different residencies. Please check the program descriptions for specific requirements. Please note that the programs are limited to the participating artist only and have various limitations e.g. communal living and/or working space or modest living quarters.

Yes, the grant to an individual that accompanies a residency is considered income and taxable. Please visit the Australian Taxation Office website for more information.

The International Residencies Program is dynamic and responsive and the programs on offer may vary from year to year.

Yes. If you are looking for some tips on organising your residency or programs in the region you’re interested in, check out the resources on our International Residencies Program web page.

There is no limit to the number of applications you can submit to the International Residencies Program. However, you will need to consider how the assessors will perceive your commitment to a particular residency program and/or market if you have applied for multiple residencies. Each residency requires you to submit a separate application form. Please note, applications to International Development funding opportunities do not count as an application to the Australia Council Grants Program.

Yes, as long as you have satisfactorily acquitted the previous residency grant.

The grant is not intended to cover lost income or rent at home and applicants will need to consider their capacity to undertake the residency prior to applying.

The Australia Council partners with established and reputable residency providers and each program is unique. Successful applicants will be provided with detailed information about each residency and introductions to the residency providers who will assist artists with making local connections. Australia Council staff are able to provide further advice and contacts, as requested. Australia Council’s International Development Consultants, across Asia, Europe, and North America, are also available as an additional resource. Artists are also expected to have their own resources, contacts and project plans for the residency.

The grant is a contribution from the Australia Council toward your travel (including airfares and travel insurance) and living costs during the residency period. Applicants are expected to research the cost of living in the residency location they are travelling to. You may need to supplement the grant with your own funds depending on your projected costs for the residency period.

No. The Australia Council cannot provide any advice on visa or immigration matters. You must contact the relevant country’s visa service to get current information. We suggest you allow plenty of time to apply for all international visas.

Accessibility varies for different residencies. Please check the program descriptions for specific requirements. Please contact the relevant adviser listed in the guidelines to discuss your access needs for these and other programs available through the International Residencies Program.

Kyoto Art Center
Residency Exchange

Ross Manning, Kyoto Art Center Residency Exchange 2019 resident.​ Credit: Michelle Manning

 

About the opportunity

The Australia Council for the Arts – in partnership with Kyoto Art Center – is offering an Australian visual artist the chance to live and work in Kyoto, Japan, as part of a residency exchange program.

In 2020, one Australian visual artist will experience a two-month studio residency at Kyoto Art Center, a multi-art form venue in Kyoto. Kyoto Art Center houses a number of performance halls, exhibition spaces and artists’ studios, and acts as a hub for visual arts and dance organisations in Kyoto and across Asia. Residents at Kyoto Art Center work alongside other international and Japanese artists and can engage in local cultural activities, such as tea ceremonies, traditional performances and workshops.

This residency is suitable for visual artists with interdisciplinary practices.

The selected Australian artist will have access to a studio inside Kyoto Art Center, and separate accommodation at a private apartment, located 10 minutes walk from the Center. The Australia Council will award the selected artist a $7,500 grant as living and travel allowance.

In a reciprocal arrangement, a Japanese artist selected by Kyoto Art Center will travel to Australia, where they will live and work in residence at Artspace, Sydney.

Current resident: Jenna Lee

Jenna Lee

Jenna Lee

Jenna Lee is a Gulumerridjin (Larrakia), Wardaman and Karra Jarri Saltwater woman with mixed Japanese, Chinese, Filipino and Anglo-Australian ancestry. Using art to explore and celebrate her many overlapping identities, Lee works across sculpture, installation, and body adornment. She also works with the moving image, photography and projection in the digital medium.

With a practice focused on materiality and ancestral material culture, Lee works with notions of the archive, histories of colonial collecting, and settler-colonial books and texts. Lee ritualistically analyses, deconstructs, and reconstructs source material, language and books, transforming them into new forms of cultural beauty and pride, and presenting a tangibly translated book.

Driven to create work in which she, her family, and the broader mixed First Nations community see themselves represented, Lee builds on a foundation of her father’s teachings of culture and her mother’s teachings of papercraft.

Represented by MARS Gallery in Naarm (Melbourne, Australia).

Image credit: Jade Florence.

Please check the general eligibility requirements  on the Australia Council website.

Applications will be assessed by the Australia Council, in consultation with Kyoto Art Center and industry advisors, against the following selection criteria.

  • quality of work previously produced
  • artistic merit
  • ability, skills and creative thinking that suggests strong artistic potential
  • public or peer response to work previously produced.
  • the skills and artistic ability of the people involved and their relevance to the proposed activity
  • realistic and achievable planning, resource use and evaluation
  • the role of any partners involved, including confirmation of their involvement
  • proposals which involve working with diverse audiences or communities, peers will look for demonstrated cultural competencies and appropriateness.
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your artistic practice
  • the relevance and timeliness of the proposed activity
  • how the proposed activity enables you to discover and develop new markets, or meet existing market demand
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your capacity as an arts professional.

The Australia Council encourages applications from applicants who identify as First Nations, from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people with disability, and people living in regional and remote areas.

The Australia Council’s programs and processes are designed for accessibility and best use by a diverse demographic. We work with individual applicants to find the best approach to accommodating access, childcare, carer and other support needs. Please contact us at least 2 weeks prior to the closing date to discuss your access and support requirements.

Additional material can be submitted to help support your application, including artist biographies, letters of support, additional written material, images, and video footage of previous work. Support material may help the assessors gain an understanding of the quality of your work, and where relevant, the skills and role of other artists or partners involved.

You are not required to submit a budget with your application.

To find out more about support material, including advice on how to get examples of your work online, click here.

Our preferred method of receiving support material is via URLs. However, if you cannot supply artistic support material via a URL, we will accept artistic support material in the following formats:

  • video (MP4, QuickTime, and Windows Media)
  • audio (MP3 and Windows Media)
  • images (JPEG and PowerPoint)
  • written material (Word and PDF)

Australia Council Staff, in consultation with Kyoto Art Center will consider applications according to the selection criteria above and will seek recommendations by industry advisors as needed.

You will be informed of the outcome of your application by late-December 2019.

The way Australia Council grants payments are made has changed. Effective immediately, grant recipients will no longer send an invoice for payment of a grant. Instead, after you accept our offer of funding, we will pay your grant into your nominated bank account and send you a Recipient Created Tax Invoice (RCTI).

If you plan to have your grant administered by a third party, applicants will now need to ensure that the administrator is registered on the Australia Council online system before you begin your application. This means you cannot complete or submit an application if your administrator is not registered.

Click on the ‘Apply now’ button at the bottom of this page. Applications must be submitted via the Australia Council’s online system.

Note, applications to International Development funding opportunities do not count as an application to the Australia Council Grants Program.

If you are applying as an organisation, please specify the staff member(s) who will participate in this activity as part of your application. If this changes, please notify us as early as possible as this may affect the status of your application.

2020 (postponed to 2022)

  • Jenna Lee

2019

  •  Ross Manning

2018

  •  Gerwyn Davies

 

 

First Peoples residencies

Kyoto Art Center
Residency Exchange

Ross Manning, Kyoto Art Center Residency Exchange 2019 resident.​ Credit: Michelle Manning

 

About the opportunity

The Australia Council for the Arts – in partnership with Kyoto Art Center – is offering an Australian visual artist the chance to live and work in Kyoto, Japan, as part of a residency exchange program.

In 2020, one Australian visual artist will experience a two-month studio residency at Kyoto Art Center, a multi-art form venue in Kyoto. Kyoto Art Center houses a number of performance halls, exhibition spaces and artists’ studios, and acts as a hub for visual arts and dance organisations in Kyoto and across Asia. Residents at Kyoto Art Center work alongside other international and Japanese artists and can engage in local cultural activities, such as tea ceremonies, traditional performances and workshops.

This residency is suitable for visual artists with interdisciplinary practices.

The selected Australian artist will have access to a studio inside Kyoto Art Center, and separate accommodation at a private apartment, located 10 minutes walk from the Center. The Australia Council will award the selected artist a $7,500 grant as living and travel allowance.

In a reciprocal arrangement, a Japanese artist selected by Kyoto Art Center will travel to Australia, where they will live and work in residence at Artspace, Sydney.

Current resident: Jenna Lee

Jenna Lee

Jenna Lee

Jenna Lee is a Gulumerridjin (Larrakia), Wardaman and Karra Jarri Saltwater woman with mixed Japanese, Chinese, Filipino and Anglo-Australian ancestry. Using art to explore and celebrate her many overlapping identities, Lee works across sculpture, installation, and body adornment. She also works with the moving image, photography and projection in the digital medium.

With a practice focused on materiality and ancestral material culture, Lee works with notions of the archive, histories of colonial collecting, and settler-colonial books and texts. Lee ritualistically analyses, deconstructs, and reconstructs source material, language and books, transforming them into new forms of cultural beauty and pride, and presenting a tangibly translated book.

Driven to create work in which she, her family, and the broader mixed First Nations community see themselves represented, Lee builds on a foundation of her father’s teachings of culture and her mother’s teachings of papercraft.

Represented by MARS Gallery in Naarm (Melbourne, Australia).

Image credit: Jade Florence.

Please check the general eligibility requirements  on the Australia Council website.

Applications will be assessed by the Australia Council, in consultation with Kyoto Art Center and industry advisors, against the following selection criteria.

  • quality of work previously produced
  • artistic merit
  • ability, skills and creative thinking that suggests strong artistic potential
  • public or peer response to work previously produced.
  • the skills and artistic ability of the people involved and their relevance to the proposed activity
  • realistic and achievable planning, resource use and evaluation
  • the role of any partners involved, including confirmation of their involvement
  • proposals which involve working with diverse audiences or communities, peers will look for demonstrated cultural competencies and appropriateness.
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your artistic practice
  • the relevance and timeliness of the proposed activity
  • how the proposed activity enables you to discover and develop new markets, or meet existing market demand
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your capacity as an arts professional.

The Australia Council encourages applications from applicants who identify as First Nations, from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people with disability, and people living in regional and remote areas.

The Australia Council’s programs and processes are designed for accessibility and best use by a diverse demographic. We work with individual applicants to find the best approach to accommodating access, childcare, carer and other support needs. Please contact us at least 2 weeks prior to the closing date to discuss your access and support requirements.

Additional material can be submitted to help support your application, including artist biographies, letters of support, additional written material, images, and video footage of previous work. Support material may help the assessors gain an understanding of the quality of your work, and where relevant, the skills and role of other artists or partners involved.

You are not required to submit a budget with your application.

To find out more about support material, including advice on how to get examples of your work online, click here.

Our preferred method of receiving support material is via URLs. However, if you cannot supply artistic support material via a URL, we will accept artistic support material in the following formats:

  • video (MP4, QuickTime, and Windows Media)
  • audio (MP3 and Windows Media)
  • images (JPEG and PowerPoint)
  • written material (Word and PDF)

Australia Council Staff, in consultation with Kyoto Art Center will consider applications according to the selection criteria above and will seek recommendations by industry advisors as needed.

You will be informed of the outcome of your application by late-December 2019.

The way Australia Council grants payments are made has changed. Effective immediately, grant recipients will no longer send an invoice for payment of a grant. Instead, after you accept our offer of funding, we will pay your grant into your nominated bank account and send you a Recipient Created Tax Invoice (RCTI).

If you plan to have your grant administered by a third party, applicants will now need to ensure that the administrator is registered on the Australia Council online system before you begin your application. This means you cannot complete or submit an application if your administrator is not registered.

Click on the ‘Apply now’ button at the bottom of this page. Applications must be submitted via the Australia Council’s online system.

Note, applications to International Development funding opportunities do not count as an application to the Australia Council Grants Program.

If you are applying as an organisation, please specify the staff member(s) who will participate in this activity as part of your application. If this changes, please notify us as early as possible as this may affect the status of your application.

2020 (postponed to 2022)

  • Jenna Lee

2019

  •  Ross Manning

2018

  •  Gerwyn Davies

Cité internationale des arts residency

A residency opportunity for Australian artists in Paris

About the opportunity

This residency is an opportunity for artists working across any artform area to direct their own program of activity and expand their practice and networks. There are three residencies on offer of three months each (with $10,000 support).

The Cité internationale des arts provides studio space to professional artists wanting to develop their practice in France. Every month, in partnership with 135 French and international organisations, the Cité’s two complementary sites welcome more than 300 artists from a wide range of disciplines for residencies lasting up to one year.

The diverse range of artists in residence at any one time allows for rich artistic conversations and potential for collaborations. The Cité has a vast network of contacts in Paris and wider France and can assist artists in developing their networks.

The complex provides facilities for artists including a print workshop and an exhibition space where artists can display their works, and an auditorium for events. The Cité also organises a program of open studios throughout the year. Please see the information pack for further details.

Resources to help strengthen your application and maximise your residency experience can be found here.

Information pack: Download PDF.

Image credit: View of the main building of the Cité internationale des arts – Site du Marais from the rue de l’Hôtel de Ville, 4th arrondissement of Paris / Photo by Maurine Tric, Adagp 2022, for the Cité internationale des arts.

Who can apply

  • Only individuals may apply to this category.
  • You must be a practicing artist or arts worker and an Australian citizen or an Australian permanent resident.

Who cannot apply

You cannot apply if:

  • you received a grant, or administered a grant, from the Australia Council in the past and that grant has not been satisfactorily acquitted
  • you owe money to the Australia Council
  • we will not accept applications from legally constituted organisations.

Australia Council staff will consider applications according to the assessment criteria and will seek recommendations by industry advisors as needed. Successful applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by mid December 2022.

Applicants must address the following assessment criteria:

  1. Artistic merit
  • suitability of your practice to the residency program and its artistic environment/offer
  • quality of work previously produced, and public and peer response to your work
  1. Viability
  • suitability of your proposal to the residency program
  • the skills and artistic ability of your collaborators and their relevance to the proposed activity
  • realistic and achievable planning, resource use and evaluation.
  1. Impact on career
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your artistic practice
  • the relevance and timeliness of the proposed activity
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your capacity as an arts professional, particularly in relation to international development and collaboration.

You should submit support material with your application. Assessors may review this support material to help them gain a better sense of your project.

What you should provide

We do not accept application-related support material submitted via post. Application-related material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your support material online, or need advice on what type of material to submit, please contact Ellen Dwyer, International Engagement Adviser, Europe on +61 02 9215 9051 or e.dwyer@australiacouncil.gov.au.

There are three types of support material you may submit:

1. Artistic support material

This should include relevant, recent examples of your artistic or cultural work.

Types of support material we accept

Our preferred method of receiving support material is via URLs (weblinks).

You can provide up to three URLs (weblinks) that link to content that is relevant to your proposal. This may include video, audio, images, or written material.

These URLs can include a total of:

  • 10 minutes of video and/or audio recording
  • 10 images
  • 10 pages of written material (for example, excerpts of literary writing).

Please note: Our assessors will not access any URLs that require them to log in or sign up to a platform. Please do not provide links to Spotify or other applications that require users to log in or pay for access.

If you are linking to media files that are private or password protected like Vimeo, please provide the password in the password field on the application form.

Other accepted file formats

If you cannot supply support material via URLs, you may upload support material to your application in the following formats:

  • video (MP4, QuickTime, and Windows Media)
  • audio (MP3 and Windows Media)
  • images (JPEG and PowerPoint)
  • written material (Word and PDF).

2. Biographies and CVs

You can include a brief bio or curriculum vitae (CV) for key artists, personnel or other collaborators involved in your project.

Brief bios or CV information should be presented as a single document no longer than two A4 pages in total.

3. Letters of support

Individuals, groups, or organisations can write letters in support of your project. A support letter should explain how the project or activity will benefit you, other artists or arts professionals, participants, or the broader community. It can also detail the support or involvement of key project partners, or evidence of consultation.

If relevant to your activity, letters of support must provide evidence of appropriate permissions and support from First Nations organisations, communities, and Elders. Please refer to the First Nations Protocols for more information.

You can include up to five letters of support, with each letter not exceeding one A4 page.

The studio is in the Cité internationale des arts site in the Marais district.

The studio is approximately 30 sqm, comprising of one large room off an entry, with a partitioned sleeping area, and a small kitchen and bathroom. The furniture is basic, with a bed, bookcase, small table, chairs and a dresser. A larger table and easel may also be requested if necessary.

The Cité is centrally located on the rue Hotel de Ville, which runs beside the Seine, approximately four blocks from the Centre Pompidou, the Louvre, and the Picasso Museum. There are four gallery districts in Paris, all within walking distance of the Cité. Close by is Le Marais, an area with many museums, commercial galleries, cheap restaurants, and coffee shops. The Cité is across the Seine from the Ile de Cité, which is the oldest part of Paris. The nearest metro stops are Pont Marie and St Paul.

The Cité’s studios are not wheelchair accessible. Additional access requirements during a residency may be accommodated on request.

The studio is suitable for a single artist or couple, but there is not the space to accommodate children.

Your application must comply with the following Protocols. We may contact you to request further information during the assessment process, or if successful, as a condition of your funding.

Protocols for using First Nations Cultural and Intellectual Property in the Arts

All applications involving First Nations artists, communities or subject matter must adhere to these Protocols, provide evidence of this in their application and support material. More information on the First Nations Protocols is available here.

Commonwealth Child Safe Framework

All successful applicants are required to comply with all Australian law relating to employing or engaging people who work or volunteer with children, including working with children checks and mandatory reporting. Successful organisations who provide services directly to children, or whose funded activities involve contact with children, will additionally be required to implement the National Principles for Child Safe Organisations.

2020-2021

  • Alisa Blakeney
  • Anita Heiss
  • Rebecca Jensen
  • Lee Serle.

2019-2020

  • Yasmin Smith
  • Gabriella Smart
  • James Batchelor
  • Madeleine Flynn and Tim Humphrey.

2018-2019

  • Willurai Kirkbright
  • Sarah Rodigari
  • Angela Goh
  • Julia Drouhin.

2017-2018

  • Mohini Chandra
  • Melissa Ashley
  • Nicola Gunn
  • Rachel Arianne Ogle.