Venice Biennale 2024: expressions of interest for artistic proposals

Opportunity for Australian artists and curators to present a ground-breaking and ambitious exhibition within the Australia Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2024.

Australia Pavilion.

Watch the recording of the information session

In this webinar held on Monday, 26 September, we provided an overview of the stage one process.

About the opportunity

Expressions of interest (EOI) are now open for artistic proposals to represent Australia in the category of National Participation for the 60th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia (Venice Biennale 2024).

The Venice Biennale is a significant platform that allows Australian contemporary art to be known globally for its innovation, sustainability, complexity, and diversity. Australia’s participation in the Venice Biennale provides Australian artists and curators with a high-profile international opportunity that includes important international exposure to new audiences, markets, and contexts. This exposure builds the profile of Australian contemporary art and stimulates international cultural links, networks and dialogue for Australian artists and curators.

Australia Council for the Arts is the commissioner in the category of National Participation for the Venice Biennale. In 2024 the Council will be the producing manager of the exhibition. The successful artistic team will work in close collaboration with the Australia Council from concept through to the development, launch and deinstallation.

The Venice Biennale typically runs for seven months, from May to November 2024.

Shortlisted applicants from the expressions of interest will be invited to submit a detailed proposal later this year (Stage Two). The successful artistic team will be announced in early 2023.

We are looking for an artistic team with the concept, credentials, and experience to exhibit in the Australia Pavilion for the Venice Biennale 2024.

A shortlisted proposal will include an artistic concept that is:

  • creatively ambitious
  • engaged with contemporary visual art discourse and global conversations
  • responsive to the architecture of the Australia Pavilion, and
  • considerate of the audiences who visit the Venice Biennale.

Proposals may focus on presenting one artist or relate to a number of artists and their practice. Similarly, proposals may include one curator or a number of curators.

Artist Fellowship

The artist/s representing Australia in the Pavilion will receive the Venice Artist Fellowship of $100,000 to develop, create, and produce new artwork(s) for the exhibition in the Australia Pavilion. Additional support towards travel and accommodation in Venice will be provided.

Curator Fellowship

The curator/s representing Australia will receive the Venice Curator Fellowship of $50,000 to provide curatorial direction for the exhibition, working closely with the Australia Council as the producer. Additional support towards travel and accommodation in Venice will be provided.

General Support

An exhibition budget covering freight and equipment, fabrication, Pavilion operations and maintenance, install and deinstall, PR and marketing will be managed by the Australia Council as the producer.

Only individuals and groups may apply to this opportunity. All members of the artistic team must be Australian citizens or Australian permanent residents and practicing artists or arts professionals.

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply for this opportunity if:

  • you have already applied to this opportunity in a separate proposal
  • you have an overdue grant report
  • you owe money to the Australia Council
  • you are an organisation.

Your EOI must address three assessment criteria.

First Criterion | Quality

The panel will assess the quality of the artistic proposal. They will consider:

  • vision, ideas, and artistic rationale
  • level of innovation, ambition, experimentation or risk-taking.

Second Criterion | Viability

The panel will assess the viability of the artistic proposal. They will consider:

  • skills and ability of artist/s and curator/s involved, and relevance to the proposal
  • evidence that you have considered and addressed audience engagement and access associated with your artistic proposal.

Third Criterion | Timeliness

The panel will assess the timeliness of the artistic proposal. They will consider:

  • the proposal’s contribution and relevance to contemporary art discourse both in Australia and Internationally.

Successful EOI applicants will be asked to submit a detailed proposal later this year (Stage Two) based on the advice of a panel of independent industry advisors including national and international visual arts experts. The names of the panelists will be published when the successful Stage Two proposal is publicly announced.

The questions we will ask in the application form include:

  • a title for your proposal
  • the names of the proposed artist/s and curator/s
    *do not list names of any technicians, consultants or any other collaborator supporting your proposal.
  • a short overview of your proposal
  • attachment of three essential and one optional support material items will be required, including a two-page artistic proposal, biographies and curriculum vitae of all members of the artistic team and examples of previous work.

You must submit support material with your application. The panel will review this support material to help them gain a better sense of your proposal.

We do not accept application-related support material submitted via post. Application-related material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your support material online or need advice on what type of material to submit, please contact the Venice Biennale Project Team.

There are four types of support material you must submit:

  1. Artistic Proposal

A maximum two (2) page, A4 PDF document titled *titleofproposal_ArtisticProposal_VeniceBiennale2024

Minimum font size must be 11pt, sans serif.

This document should address the three assessment criteria outlined in these guidelines and provide a summary of your artistic proposal for the Australia Pavilion.

*You are not required to submit visuals or a realised exhibition concept in this EOI Stage One.

  1. Curriculum Vitae

A maximum one (1) page per individual, A4 PDF document titled *titleofproposal_CV_VeniceBiennale2024

Minimum font size must be 11pt, sans serif.

This document should include a short bio of each member, illustrate relevant experience and practice achievements of each member.

  1. Artistic support material

A maximum four (4) pages per artist, A4 PDF document titled *titleofproposal_previouswork_VeniceBiennale2024

Minimum font size must be 11pt, sans serif.

This document should include images and brief overview text of previous work. Do not include web links in this document.

  1. Letter of support from gallery (optional)

If you are affiliated with a commercial gallery, please provide a letter of support from them outlining the nature of their support towards your participation. An individual letter can be submitted for each artist forming part of the team.

If you are not affiliated with a commercial gallery, you do not need to submit this letter.

CINARS 2022 Biennale

Blood on the Dance Floor by Jacob Boehme. Credit: Dorine Blaise.

About the program

Established in 1984, taking place every two years, CINARS is one of the most important international showcases and networking events attracting over 1900 performing arts professionals from around the globe.

The Australia Council will support a delegation to attend this event. We also welcome any Australian artists and companies attending on a self-funded basis to join the delegation and any related networking activities.

More details on the event can be found on the CINARS website.

Funding

Australia Council will support 10 delegates with $4,000 each, towards the cost of travel. These supported delegates will be responsible for all costs associated with attending the market including flights, visas, insurance, accommodation and registration.

Who can apply

  • This opportunity is for Australian-based artists and/or producers working independently or within organisations.

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply for this grant if:

  • you have an overdue grant report
  • you owe money to the Australia Council.

Applicants are required to respond to the following assessment criteria:

  1. The impact of attendance at CINARS in developing future international opportunities and enhancing international visibility.
  2. Demonstrated understanding of and commitment to the region and market.
  3. The timeliness of this opportunity and demonstrated ability to plan and deliver on any international outcomes that may arise.

Your application will be reviewed by Australia Council staff and industry advisers against the assessment criteria.

Applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by late September 2022.

No supporting material is required for this application.

Internationale Tanzmesse NRW

Apply for support to attend the largest international professional gathering for contemporary dance.

Urban Dance Day at internationale tanzmesse nrw 2018. Photo credit Dmitrij Matvejev.

About the opportunity  

Tanzmesse is the largest international professional gathering for contemporary dance. Taking place every two years, the event is attended by up to 2,000 international exhibitors and visitors, and is an important forum for exchange, knowledge transfer and networking.

The Australia Council will support a delegation to attend this event. We also welcome any Australian artists and companies attending on a self-funded basis to join the delegation and any related networking activities.

You can find more details on the event on Tanzmesse’s website. You may also be interested in viewing the recording of APAM’s The Future of Market Platforms Series: Internationale Tanzmesse nrw conversation.

Applicants are encouraged to consider extending their time in the region to undertake additional market or professional development activities beyond Tanzmesse.

Other festivals and events taking place in Europe and the UK in August and September include:

Australia Council will support delegates based in Australia with $3,000 and overseas-based Australian delegates with $1,500 towards the cost of travel to attend Tanzmesse. These delegates will be responsible for all costs associated with attending the event including flights, visas, insurance, accommodation, and registration.

Who can apply

This opportunity is for dance artists and/or producers working independently or within organisations.

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply for this grant if:

  • you have an overdue grant report
  • you owe money to the Australia Council.

Applicants are required to respond to the following assessment criteria:

  1. The impact of attendance at Tanzmesse in developing future international opportunities for your work.
  2. Demonstrated understanding of, and commitment to, the region and market.
  3. The timeliness of this opportunity and a demonstrated ability to plan and deliver on any international outcomes that may arise.

Your application will be reviewed by Australia Council staff and industry advisers against the assessment criteria.

Applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by 12 July 2022.

No support material is required for this application.

Frequently asked questions

No. You are not required to provide a budget with your application.

No. You are not required to provide support material with your application.

Internationale Tanzmesse NRW

Apply for support to attend the largest international professional gathering for contemporary dance.

Urban Dance Day at internationale tanzmesse nrw 2018. Photo credit Dmitrij Matvejev.

About the opportunity  

Tanzmesse is the largest international professional gathering for contemporary dance. Taking place every two years, the event is attended by up to 2,000 international exhibitors and visitors, and is an important forum for exchange, knowledge transfer and networking.

The Australia Council will support a delegation to attend this event. We also welcome any Australian artists and companies attending on a self-funded basis to join the delegation and any related networking activities.

You can find more details on the event on Tanzmesse’s website. You may also be interested in viewing the recording of APAM’s The Future of Market Platforms Series: Internationale Tanzmesse nrw conversation.

Applicants are encouraged to consider extending their time in the region to undertake additional market or professional development activities beyond Tanzmesse.

Other festivals and events taking place in Europe and the UK in August and September include:

Australia Council will support delegates based in Australia with $3,000 and overseas-based Australian delegates with $1,500 towards the cost of travel to attend Tanzmesse. These delegates will be responsible for all costs associated with attending the event including flights, visas, insurance, accommodation, and registration.

Who can apply

This opportunity is for dance artists and/or producers working independently or within organisations.

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply for this grant if:

  • you have an overdue grant report
  • you owe money to the Australia Council.

Applicants are required to respond to the following assessment criteria:

  1. The impact of attendance at Tanzmesse in developing future international opportunities for your work.
  2. Demonstrated understanding of, and commitment to, the region and market.
  3. The timeliness of this opportunity and a demonstrated ability to plan and deliver on any international outcomes that may arise.

Your application will be reviewed by Australia Council staff and industry advisers against the assessment criteria.

Applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by 12 July 2022.

No support material is required for this application.

Frequently asked questions

Are the residency dates flexible? No. The dates for this residency are fixed.

Yes, but this will be at your own cost and the Australia Council will not be able to provide additional funds towards the extension.

No. You are not required to provide a budget with your application.

There is no requirement for you to provide a timetable of your activities, unless stated otherwise in the individual residency program guidelines.

Yes. If successful, you are required to take out travel insurance for the duration of your residency. It is recommended you pay for this from your grant.

The unit will accommodate couples and Acme can arrange additional bedding for additional guests. However, Fire Station work/live units are not family friendly.

Yes, the grant to an individual that accompanies a residency is considered income and taxable. Please visit the Australian Taxation Office website for more information.

The International Residencies Program is dynamic and responsive and the programs on offer may vary from year to year.

Yes. If you are looking for some tips on organising your residency or programs in the region you’re interested in, check out the Tips and Links resources on our International Engagement web page.

Yes. Please note, applications to International Engagement funding opportunities do not count as an application to the Australia Council Grants Program.

Yes, as long as you have satisfactorily acquitted the previous residency grant.

The grant is not intended to cover lost income or rent at home and applicants will need to consider their capacity to undertake the residency prior to applying.

The Australia Council partners with established and reputable residency providers and each program is unique. Successful applicants will be provided with detailed information about each residency and introductions to the residency providers who will assist artists with making local connections. Australia Council staff are able to provide further advice and contacts, as requested. Artists are also expected to have their own resources, contacts and project plans for the residency.

The grant is a contribution from the Australia Council toward your travel (including airfares and travel insurance) and living costs during the residency period. Applicants are expected to research the cost of living in the residency location they are travelling to. You may need to supplement the grant with your own funds depending on your projected costs for the residency period.

No. The Australia Council cannot provide any advice on visa or immigration matters. You must contact the relevant country’s visa service to get current information. We suggest you allow plenty of time to apply for all international visas.

Access needs for living quarters during a residency can be accommodated on request.

Internationale Tanzmesse NRW

Apply for support to attend the largest international professional gathering for contemporary dance.

Urban Dance Day at internationale tanzmesse nrw 2018. Photo credit Dmitrij Matvejev.

About the opportunity  

Tanzmesse is the largest international professional gathering for contemporary dance. Taking place every two years, the event is attended by up to 2,000 international exhibitors and visitors, and is an important forum for exchange, knowledge transfer and networking.

The Australia Council will support a delegation to attend this event. We also welcome any Australian artists and companies attending on a self-funded basis to join the delegation and any related networking activities.

You can find more details on the event on Tanzmesse’s website. You may also be interested in viewing the recording of APAM’s The Future of Market Platforms Series: Internationale Tanzmesse nrw conversation.

Applicants are encouraged to consider extending their time in the region to undertake additional market or professional development activities beyond Tanzmesse.

Other festivals and events taking place in Europe and the UK in August and September include:

Australia Council will support delegates based in Australia with $3,000 and overseas-based Australian delegates with $1,500 towards the cost of travel to attend Tanzmesse. These delegates will be responsible for all costs associated with attending the event including flights, visas, insurance, accommodation, and registration.

Who can apply

This opportunity is for dance artists and/or producers working independently or within organisations.

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply for this grant if:

  • you have an overdue grant report
  • you owe money to the Australia Council.

Applicants are required to respond to the following assessment criteria:

  1. The impact of attendance at Tanzmesse in developing future international opportunities for your work.
  2. Demonstrated understanding of, and commitment to, the region and market.
  3. The timeliness of this opportunity and a demonstrated ability to plan and deliver on any international outcomes that may arise.

Your application will be reviewed by Australia Council staff and industry advisers against the assessment criteria.

Applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by 12 July 2022.

No support material is required for this application.

Additional information

Once you submit your application, we will send you an email acknowledging receipt of your application.

After you submit your application, we first check it meets the eligibility criteria for the grant or opportunity to which you are applying.

Applications for this program are assessed by Australia Council staff, and industry advisers as required, against the published assessment criteria for the relevant grant program.

We aim to notify you of the outcome of your application no later than 6 weeks after the published closing date for the applicable grant round.

Once all applications have been assessed, you will be contacted about the outcome of your application. If you have been successful, you will also be sent a funding agreement. This outlines the conditions of funding, how you will be paid and your grant reporting requirements. The following accordion items outline these stages in more detail.

If your application is successful, you will receive an email advising you a grant is offered. You must then agree to the conditions of your grant, which represents the Australia Council’s contract with you – this can be done online, by email or by letter. Payment of a grant will not be made until the grant conditions have been agreed and accepted by all the relevant parties.

You should not start a project that depends on a grant until all relevant parties have agreed and accepted the grant conditions and we have evidence of such acceptance on file.

Standard grant conditions require you to, among other things:

  • seek prior approval for making a change to a funded project (for example, changes in the activity budget; changes to key creative personnel; or changes to start or end dates)
  • respond to requests for information about the project or grant
  • satisfactorily account for how the grant is spent (if you do not you will be required to return all monies for which you cannot satisfactorily account)
  • comply with all applicable laws
  • acknowledge the Australia Council’s support in all promotional material associated with the project; this includes use of the Australia Council’s logo and a standard text of acknowledgement.
  • provide artistic and financial acquittal reports at the end of the project
  • return any unspent grant funds at the completion of your project or on notice from us to return such unspent funds.

Grant agreements must be signed by a legal entity – either a legally constituted organisation or an individual. For unincorporated groups, see the section on administered grants

All individual or organisation grant applicants based in Australia must have an ABN. Individual applicants without an ABN may have their grant administered by an individual or organisation with an ABN. Organisations operating outside of Australia do not need an ABN to apply. Individuals based outside of Australia may not need an ABN to apply, depending on their circumstances (please check with your accountant or tax advisor).

The name of the applicant must match the name of the ABN and the name of the bank account into which we pay the funds. There are no exceptions to this rule. If applicants cannot provide an ABN and bank account that are in the same name as the applicant’s name, they will need to nominate an administrator for their grant.

Groups/ensembles/collectives, unincorporated associations/ unincorporated entities and other bodies with no legal status do not need an administrator if they have an active Australian Business Number (ABN) and bank account in their name. If they are unable to provide an active ABN and bank account that matches the name of the applicant, they must nominate an administrator. The name of the administrator must match the name of the ABN and bank account into which funds are paid if the application is successful.

If we approve your application you will need accept the conditions of the grant in a funding agreement.

After you accept your funding agreement online, we will automatically generate a payment for the grant on your behalf. You do not need to send us an invoice.

We will pay grant funds directly into your nominated bank account within two weeks after acceptance of the funding agreement. Grant payments cannot be postponed.

If you do not wish to have the grant funds paid directly into your bank account you can choose to have your grant administered by another individual or legally constituted organisation (Doesn’t apply to Arts Projects – Organisations).

When you apply, you will be asked to provide an active Australian Business Number or ‘ABN’. The ABN that you provide must correspond to the name of the applicant (or the administering body, if one has been nominated). When you accept your funding agreement, you will be asked to enter the details of the bank account you wish the grant to be paid into. The name associated with that bank account must correspond to the name in which the ABN has been registered.

Download the Australia Council for the Arts logo guidelines here.

Download the Major Festivals Initiative logo guidelines here.

Grant reports are required on completion of your project. Acquitting a grant means accurately reporting on the funded activities and the expenditure of Australia Council funding.

Please read your funding agreement to check details of the grant acquittal material you should provide.

The grant acquittal report is where you tell us:

  • how you spent your grant
  • what the artistic outcomes of your funded activity were.

If you do not provide a satisfactory grant report at the times and in the manner detailed in your funding agreement, the Australia Council will not make any further payments that may be due to you, and you will not be eligible  to apply for further grants.

If you do not provide a satisfactory grant report, the Australia Council may ask you to pay back all or part of the funding provided to you.

Grant reports are used by the Australia Council to fulfil obligations of accountability to the Australian Government. They are also essential to the development work of the Australia Council. The reports help us evaluate the achievements of funded activities, monitor the effectiveness of grant categories and ensure our policy development is consistent with the experience of artists in the field.

Reporting for Multi-year Funded Organisations

Organisations in receipt of multi-year funding are required to submit financial, statistical, and artistic reporting on an annual basis.

All reporting is submitted online via the Australia Council’s arts organisations reporting system.

If you are not sure what reporting you need to submit as part of your annual reporting, or what information to provide, please get in touch with your Australia Council contact.

All recipients must acknowledge that the Australia Council provided funding for their activities. When you acquit your grant, we will ask you how you acknowledged the Australia Council.

For printed or online material use our logo and this phrase:

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body OR The (company name) is assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

Logos for download and guidelines for the use of our logos.

Where projects do not have a public outcome, or do not produce any printed or online material, you will need to think about how best to acknowledge the Australia Council funding.

Biennale Delegates Program Participants

The program will facilitate exchange of ideas, catalyse new perspectives and support the seeding of future projects and collaborations.

About the program

A diverse group of 19 emerging creative and cultural workers from across Australia have been announced as participants of the Australia Council Biennale Delegates Program.

The program’s theme is ‘re(situate)’ and will focus on unpacking different biennale engagement approaches within an Australian and regional context. The participants will connect with artists and teams presenting the 59th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, Hawaiʻi Triennial, Documenta 15 and The Biennale of Sydney.

Participants will be guided through the program by Clothilde Bullen, Angie Abdilla, Léuli Eshrāghi, Khaled Sabsabi and Neha Kale. Through online gatherings and an in-person (NSW) residency to facilitate exchange of ideas, catalyse new perspectives and support the seeding of future projects and collaborations.

The 2022 Biennale Delegates Program is generously supported by state and territory partners including ArtsACT, Create NSW, Arts NT, Arts Queensland, Arts South Australia, Arts Tasmania and Creative Victoria and the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries – Western Australia as well as the Cross Family Foundations.

2022 Delegates:

  • Yvette Dal Pozzo (ACT) 
  • Chrischona Schmidt (NT) 
  • Rebekah Raymond (NT) 
  • Aleshia Lonsdale (NSW) 
  • Eddie Abd (NSW) 
  • Jazz Money (NSW) 
  • Riana Head-Toussaint (NSW)
  • Mandy Quadrio (QLD) 
  • Ruha Fifita (QLD)
  • Erin Davidson (SA) 
  • Rayleen Forester (SA) 
  • Sarra Tzijan (SA)
  • Theia Connell (TAS) 
  • Claire G. Coleman (VIC)  
  • Nikki Lam (VIC)
  • Sebastian Henry-Jones (VIC) 
  • Esther McDowell/Yabini Kickett (WA) 
  • Gok-Lim Finch (WA) 
  • Rachel Ciesla (WA)

 

Note: click on images below to learn more about the delegates.

2022 Delegates

Yvette Dal Pozzo – ACT

Yvette Dal Pozzo – ACT

Yvette Dal Pozzo is the Director of the Goulburn Regional Art Gallery. Prior to this role, Yvette was at the National Gallery of Australia, where she worked on major projects, including the two-part exhibition ‘Know My Name: Australian Women Artists 1900 to Now’ and was the editorial assistant and contributor of the corresponding publication titled ‘Know My Name’ (2020). She was also the coordinating editor of Roger Butler’s publication ‘Printed: images by Australian artists 1942-2020’ (2021).

In 2019, Yvette was selected as an Exhibition Attendant to facilitate the Australia Pavilion as part of the 58th Venice Biennale. She has held appointments in galleries, arts festivals, and universities. Yvette holds a Master of Art History and Curatorial Studies from the Australian National University and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree from the University of Melbourne.

Chrischona Schmidt – NT

Chrischona Schmidt – NT

Chrischona is an arts professional and researcher with a background in art history and social anthropology. She has worked with Central Australian Indigenous communities as a researcher and art centre manager since 2006. In 2018, as Manager at Ikuntji Artists, the business won the Australian Small Business Champion Awards in Indigenous Business. The art centre is now one of the most renowned fine art specialised Indigenous art centres in Australia.
Before that, she worked in research and different areas of the art market, including auction houses, galleries and museums in Australia and overseas.
Chrischona researches local art histories in Central Australia with a particular focus on women’s work. She wrote the first art history of an art movement without an art centre and co-organised the first conference on Indigenous jewellery. She engages actively with the academic discourse through her publications, conference attendance and as a co-organiser of the University of Queensland art history program field school.

Rebekah Raymond – NT

Rebekah Raymond – NT

Rebekah Raymond is a proud Arabana, Mualgal, and Wuthathi woman, with further cultural connections which have been disrupted by the Stolen Generations. She grew up on Larrakia Country and Limilngan-Wulna Country. Rebekah holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Sydney, with majors in Art History and Archaeology.

Rebekah has worked across state and national arts organisations and institutions, while also undertaking independent curatorial, editorial and research projects. Her curatorial practice centres community collaboration, language, archives, and intergenerational knowledge. She currently works as the Curator of Aboriginal Art and Material Culture at the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory (MAGNT), located on Larrakia Country.

Aleshia Lonsdale – NSW

Aleshia Lonsdale – NSW

Aleshia Lonsdale is a Visual Artist, Arts Worker and Curator based in regional New South Wales (NSW). As a proud Wiradjuri woman from Mudgee in Central Western NSW, Lonsdale creates work using various materials, including natural and found objects that endeavour to give voice to First Nations peoples. She sees the arts as a vehicle for intergenerational cultural transmission and as a tool that allows the audience to view the world through a First Nations lens. With a strong grounding in Culture and Country, her works are influenced by the past, present and future experiences of First Nations Peoples with a particular focus on social, cultural, political and environmental issues.

Eddie Abd – NSW

Eddie Abd – NSW

Eddie Abd is an artist and arts worker living and working on unceded Darug and Gundungurra Lands. Eddie creates intricate, multilayered digital and textile works grounded in her lived experience while responding to a range of concerns from the social to the political and religious.

Her video and digital print works often feature self-referential composite characters inhabiting remixed spaces and engaging in heightened acts of identity performance. Eddie was awarded the 2021 Blake Prize (Emerging Artist) and shortlisted for the Create NSW 2021/2022 Visual Arts (Emerging) Fellowship.

Born in Lebanon in 1979, Eddie studied Fine Arts (Painting) at the Lebanese University. After moving to Australia in 2001, she completed a Bachelor of Digital Media at the University of New South Wales (COFA).

Jazz Money – NSW

Jazz Money – NSW

Jazz Money is a poet and artist of Wiradjuri heritage, a fresh-water woman currently based on Gadigal land. Her practice is centred around the written word while producing works that encompass installation, digital, film and print. Jazz’s writing has been widely performed and published nationally and internationally.

Trained as a filmmaker and arts worker, Jazz specialises in storytelling, community collaboration and digital production, working with First Nations artists and communities to realise digital projects.

Jazz’s debut collection of poetry, ‘how to make a basket’, was released in September 2021 with University of Queensland Press.

Riana Head-Toussaint – NSW

Riana Head-Toussaint – NSW

Riana Head-Toussaint is an interdisciplinary disabled artist who uses a manual wheelchair for mobility. Her work often crosses traditional artform boundaries and exists in online and offline spaces. She employs performance, choreography, video/film, sound design, installation and audience activation to create works that interrogate entrenched systems, structures and ways of thinking; and advocate for social change. The enduring concerns across her works are agency, representation, the limits of empathy, and how these impact people across various marginalised intersections. Her work is deeply informed by her experiences as a disabled woman of Afro-Caribbean heritage and her training as a legal practitioner.

Riana’s practice also involves broader curatorial/space-making projects. She is the founder of Headquarters, a disability-led, digital space; centring and celebrating disabled creatives. Riana is also a qualified Solicitor and Access Consultant. She lives and works on the unceded lands of the Eora Nation.

Mandy Quadrio – QLD

Mandy Quadrio – QLD

Mandy Quadrio is an Indigenous Palawa artist connected to her maternal ancestral countries of Tebrakunna, north-east Tasmania and the Oyster Bay Nation of eastern Tasmania. Currently based in Meanjin (Brisbane), she works across sculpture, installation, photography and mixed media. She received a Doctorate in Visual Arts at Queensland College of Art, Griffith University, in 2021.

By reimagining cultural associations of Indigenous and non-Indigenous objects, Quadrio aims to draw attention to historical and contemporary cultural and political events that impact Australian Indigenous people. She works to expose holes and myths in Australian colonial histories

Quadrio has shown in numerous solo, and group shows around Australia, including the TarraWarra Biennial in Melbourne in 2021 and at Ace Open in Adelaide as part of Tarnanthi festival of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art 2021. Her work was permanently acquired by the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston, Tasmania, in 2021.

Ruha Fifita – QLD

Ruha Fifita – QLD

Ruha Fifita (Tonga/New Zealand) is an interdisciplinary artis based in Brisbane. She is co-founder of Pacific art research collective, IVI, Griffith Asia Institute Industry Fellow, and Curatorial Assistant for Pacific Art at the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

Her creative practice fosters collaboration, community engagement and connection with indigenous methods and materials to achieve social change. She holds a Bachelor of Creative Industries, and a post-graduate Certificate in Discourse and Social Transformation.

Ruha’s work has exhibited throughout the Pacific region in settings such as, the Mori Art Museum, Festival of Pacific Arts, the Dreaming Festival, Auckland Art Festival, Pataka Art Gallery, the National Gallery of Victoria, the Tjibaou Cultural Centre, UNSW Gallery, and Seoul Museum of Art.

Erin Davidson – SA

Erin Davidson – SA

Erin Davidson holds the position of Project Manager at the Art Gallery of South Australia and is responsible for delivering two of the country’s major biennial programs celebrating contemporary art and artists, the Ramsay Art Prize and the Adelaide Biennial Australian Art. Over the last decade, she has worked with South Australian cultural institutions and organisations in various roles.

In 2021, she commenced lecturing in Business Practice for Artists and Designers at the University of South Australia. Her formal education includes Interior Design, Art History, Criticism and Conservation, and Museum and Curatorial Studies. Her professional experiences range from tutoring in interior design, working in engineering and design studios, and managing exhibitions and projects for arts and cultural organisations.

Rayleen Forester – SA

Rayleen Forester – SA

Rayleen Forester is an Adelaide based, independent curator and arts writer. She holds Graduate Diplomas in Art History (University of Adelaide) and Arts & Cultural Management (University of South Australia) and is a South Australian School of Art graduate.

Rayleen’s curatorial interests focus on cross-cultural engagement through contemporary and experimental art practices. She was awarded the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi Travel Grant (2010) to collaborate with Japanese curator and Gallery Director Katsuya Ishida and the inaugural Curator Mentorship Initiative grant (2012) to work with international curator Cuauhtémoc Medina at the MANIFESTA biennale. She co-curated the Artists’ Week symposium in 2014 with Lars Bang Larsen (DEN) and Richard Grayson (UK). In 2016, she completed a residency at ICI New York curatorial hub program.

Rayleen writes for national publications and is a founding member of initiatives FELTspace and fine print magazine. In 2020 she was inaugural curator in residence at ACE Open, Adelaide, co-curating If the future is to be worth anything: 2020 Artist Survey with Artistic Director, Patrice Sharkey.

Sarra Tzijan – SA

Sarra Tzijan – SA

Sarra Tzijan is an Indian/Australian artist, originally from Naarm, now living in Tarntanya. Tzijan makes functional, sculptural and wearable objects, playing with the intersections of art and craft, highlighting their limitations. She draws on her mixed heritage to unpack themes of belonging, cultural displacement and colonisation. Adopting a multi-disciplinary and collaborative approach, she encourages the influence of others in her work.

During early education, Tzijan focused on drawing and illustration. In 2014 she completed a degree in Communication Design (RMIT), refining her work on paper. In 2016 she completed an Advanced Diploma of Object and Jewellery Design (Melbourne Polytechnic) and began combining her illustrative aesthetic with three-dimensional objects. In 2018 she was selected to undertake an associateship at JamFactory in the metal studio where she’s currently a tenant.

Theia Connell – TAS

Theia Connell – TAS

Theia Connell is an artist, curator and producer living on unceded Muwinina country in nipaluna/Hobart. Her professional practice has seen her working within festivals, museums, galleries and not-for-profit art spaces regularly for a decade. Theia works closely with contemporary artists to build exhibitions, live events and site-specific projects. Her practice is grounded in the value of collaboration and mutual support and in developing meaningful context for experimental art.

Recent roles include Co-founder and Co-director of Visual Bulk art space, member of the Artistic Directorate at Next Wave, Creative Associate at Dark Mofo, Creative Producer at Dark Mofo, and board member at CONSTANCE ARI. She has exhibited as an independent artist across Australia and internationally, including Incheon Art Platform (Seoul), Snehta (Athens), BUS Projects, Watch This Space ARI, Firstdraft, Kings ARI and more. Theia completed a BFA (Visual Art) at VCA in 2014, and a BA (Art History) at University of Melbourne in 2010.

Claire G. Coleman – VIC

Claire G. Coleman – VIC

Claire G. Coleman is a Noongar woman whose ancestral country is on the south coast of Western Australia.  Born in Perth, she has spent most of her life in Naarm (Melbourne).

Her debut novel Terra Nullius, published by Hachette in Australia and Small Beer in the US, won a black&write! Fellowship and a Norma K. Hemming Award and was shortlisted for the Stella Prize and the Aurealis Science Fiction Award, among others. The Old Lie (Hachette 2019) is her second novel.

Her art criticism has been published in Spectrum, Artlink and Art Collector, and in exhibition catalogues for NGV, AGSA, NGA, and others.  Her conceptual/video work, Refugium, won the Incinerator Art Award in 2021.

Lies Damned Lies: A Personal Exploration of the Impact of Colonisation, her first nonfiction book published in September 2021 by Ultimo Press.

Nikki Lam – VIC

Nikki Lam – VIC

Nikki Lam is an artist, curator and producer based in Naarm. Working primarily with moving images, her practice explores hybridity and memory through the contemplation on time, space and impermanence. Born in Hong Kong, her work deals with the complexity of migratory expressions. Nikki’s current research focuses on the artistic agency during cultural, social and political transitions, particularly within the context of moving image and screen cultures. With an expanded practice in writing, exhibition and festival making, she is interested in exploring anti-colonial methods in artistic and curatorial practice.

Nikki is the co-director of Hyphenated Projects and Hyphenated Biennial, and curator-at-large at The Substation. She was Artistic Director of Channels video art festival, alongside many hybrid roles in the arts including at ACMI, Next Wave and Footscray Community Arts Centre. Nikki is a current PhD (Art) candidate at RMIT University.

Sebastian Henry-Jones – VIC

Sebastian Henry-Jones – VIC

Sebastian Henry-Jones is a curator led by an interest in writing, DIY thinking, and the exhibition format’s potential to cultivate strategies of collectivity, social responsibility, and tenderness. He looks to embody these ideals in his work by centring the needs, ideas, and requirements of those he works with. His practice is informed by striving for personal ethics with sincerity, generosity, honest communication, and learning at its core.

Seb has staged group exhibitions and independent projects in Sydney and interstate and co-founded Desire Lines and Emerson. Previously, he was an editor at Runway Journal and has held curatorial roles at The 22nd Biennale of Sydney and West Space.

Esther McDowell/Yabini Kickett – WA

Esther McDowell/Yabini Kickett – WA

Yabini Kickett (Esther McDowell) is a descendant of the Kickett and Hayden families of the Bibulmun/Noongar Nation. Having grown up with an artist and poet mother and a photographer and land conservationist father, her practice is heavily rooted in language, endemic plants, family, totemic relations and found objects from Country.

Yabini has exhibited as an independent artist across Australia, including at Art Gallery of Western Australia (2021), Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts (2020), Cool Change Contemporary (2018) and more.

Gok-Lim Finch – WA

Gok-Lim Finch – WA

Gok-Lim is a writer and artist living on the unceded sovereign lands of the Whadjuk people of the Bibbulmun nation. In 2019, they were a Creative Research Fellow for the State Library of WA. From 2018 to 2020, they were the board secretary of Propel Youth Arts WA, and the Project Coordinator for Community Arts Network’s Lotterywest Story Street project. They are currently studying a PhD at the University of Western Australia on the history of the Christmas Island workers union and working as the Student Engagement Officer for Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery.

Rachel Ciesla – WA

Rachel Ciesla – WA

Rachel Cieśla is the Lead Creative for the Simon Lee Foundation Institute of Contemporary Asian Art at the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Boorloo. She is also a co-founder and co-editor of Heart of Hearts Press.

International Engagement Strategy

Betty Grumble’s Enemies of Grooviness Eat Shit, produced by Performing Lines. Credit: Joseph Mayers Photography

The Australia Council is pleased to release our new International Engagement Strategy 2021-2025.  

The strategy has been informed by national and international sector consultation, and an evaluation of the activity delivered under the Australia Council’s International Arts Strategy 2015-2020.

Read and download the strategy here.

Read our Impact Report here, which presents findings and insights from the evaluation.

We are committed to supporting Australian artists, creative workers and organisations to build and sustain international connections. Our work expands opportunities for engagement through hybrid and online activities while international travel is restricted.

Our vision is for Australian arts, culture and creativity to be thriving and to be known globally for its innovation, sustainability, complexity and diversity.  

Our work strengthens the international profile, reputation, influence, and capability of the Australian cultural and creative sector. We aim to increase the discoverability, access and distribution of Australian cultural and creative content internationally and build the capability of artists to operate successfully in international contexts. 

We deliver strong and purposeful advocacy for artists, and creative and market opportunities that create value. We foster people-to-people connections, and create opportunities for cultural exchange, expertise and knowledge sharing to showcase Australian creativity, culture and identity. 

The priorities of the new strategy are, to:  

  • rethink and expand the concept of mobility through testing dynamic engagement models that include digital, hybrid and in-person connection   
  • leverage technologies and digital platforms for creation, distribution, networking, and increasing discoverability of Australian work  
  • activate borderless thinking to build reciprocal and multilateral partnerships across regions and industries, and leverage co-investment    
  • strengthen First Nations exchange that is First Nations-led and self-determined   
  • amplify Asia Pacific engagement, and the perspectives of the Asia Pacific diaspora in Australia   
  • diversify income and revenue streams to foster sustainable careers and business models by increasing access to markets, information and networks and showcase Australian work to global audiences and influencers   
  • foster risk-taking, experimentation and innovation in creation, distribution, connection and profile-building   
  • centre equity and access and reflect Australia’s diversity   
  • embed sustainability through research and investment in best-practice models and frameworks to minimise the sector’s carbon footprint.   

Underpinned by the Australia Council’s Corporate Plan priorities, our work is responsive to emergent issues, trends, practices, circumstances and disruption; and to industry needs. 

Contact 

For International Engagement Strategy enquiries: 

international@australiacouncil.gov.au 

If you are an Australian artist or arts worker overseas, please contact us if you need to discuss your situation. If you haven’t already done so, register with Smartraveller and refer to this site to see the latest updates on travel restrictions and advice. 

If you are an Australian artist or arts worker overseas and require assistance, please refer to the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade website for a list of Australian embassies, high commissions and consulates and their contact details. 

We acknowledge the distress, hardship and isolation felt by artists and arts workers at this time. For support contact Lifeline on 13 11 14, Beyond Blue on 1300 224 636 or Support Act on 1800 959 500. 

While Australian borders and many international borders have reopened, COVID-19 remains an ongoing global health risk.

Applicants should ensure duty of care, health and wellbeing, risk mitigation, travel restrictions, pre-departure testing requirements and local physical distancing measures are reviewed while planning their international activities.

Applications to the Australia Council involving international travel must consider the Australian Government’s latest travel advice. Visit Smartraveller for more details on changing travel advice levels and specific country information.

International Engagement Fund

The Australia Council’s International Engagement Fund supports a range of activity that fosters people-to people connections; creates opportunities for cultural exchange and knowledge sharing; and showcases Australian creativity, culture and identity internationally.

Applications for this round of the International Engagement Fund can be made by applying to either Arts Projects for Organisations or Arts Projects for Individuals and Groups, closing Tuesday 7 March 2023 at 3pm AEDT.

This round of Arts Projects for Organisations and Arts Projects for Individuals and Groups includes additional funding from the International Engagement Fund which will support competitive applications that meet the priorities of the International Engagement Strategy 2021-2025.

Watch a recording of the online information session

Activity may take place in any part of the world in line with the Australia Council’s new International Engagement Strategy 2021–2025.

The priorities of the new strategy are, to:

  • rethink and expand the concept of mobility through testing dynamic engagement models that include digital, hybrid and in-person connection
  • leverage technologies and digital platforms for creation, distribution, networking, and increasing discoverability of Australian work
  • activate borderless thinking to build reciprocal and multilateral partnerships across regions and industries, and leverage co-investment
  • strengthen First Nations exchange that is First Nations-led and self-determined
  • amplify Asia Pacific engagement, and the perspectives of the Asia Pacific diaspora in Australia
  • diversify income and revenue streams to foster sustainable careers and business models by increasing access to markets, information and networks and showcase Australian work to global audiences and influencers
  • foster risk-taking, experimentation and innovation in creation, distribution, connection and profile-building
  • centre equity and access and reflect Australia’s diversity
  • embed sustainability through research and investment in best-practice models and frameworks to minimise the sector’s carbon footprint.

You can view the full International Engagement Strategy here.

Our vision is for Australian arts, culture and creativity to be thriving and known globally for its innovation, sustainability and diversity.

If you wish to apply for a literary translation and/or publication overseas please apply to the Australia Council’s Translation Fund for Literature.


Case studies

Below are some examples of Australian work presented internationally since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Theses activities required that also intersect with the priorities of the International Engagement Strategy 2021-2025. These are some examples of activities that are likely to be competitive in this fund, in addition to the list of successful applicants from Round 1 and Round 2. 

  • Andrew Undi Lee: Night Bloomers – the webtoon series is an online and intercontinental collaboration between Korean Australian and native Korean webtoon artists, working together to produce a 6-part anthology webtoon series that reflect various Korean Diaspora narratives from Australia. February 2022 to February 2023.
  • Miku Performing Arts: Gapu Nguban (Chasing the Rainbow) is a powerful, celebratory new work of song, music and dance being created by First Nations artists – Yolgnu artists from Arnhem Land, NT, and Paiwan tribe from Taiwan. Artback NT and Kath Papas Productions are co-producing the work in Australia, with Dremedreman Curimudjuq as co-producer in Taiwan. August 2022 to August 2023.
  • Pony Express: The Live Art duo Pony Express along with Performing Lines and Chronus Art Center Shanghai undertake a mixed-reality, interactive Livestream of Epoch Wars. A 5-hour, experiential, subversive video conference meets radical, immersive performance broadcasting simultaneously with the large-scale premiere at New Annual Festival, Newcastle. September to October 2022
  • Arts Project Australia,  Art et al., an inclusive international platform that commissions and presents collaborations between artists from supported studios, artist peers and arts professionals, presented online, from April 2021
  • ARP Press, Winnipeg and Art Gallery of South Australia publication of Becoming Our Future: Global Indigenous Curatorial Practice, in collaboration with the University of Winnipeg, the Canada Council, Australia Council and Creative New Zealand, June 2020
  • Eliza Hull, attendance at SXSW in Austin, Texas, to speak on a panel on disability and accessibility and perform two showcases with her band, including the Sounds Australia showcase and a disability specific showcase, ‘Accessible all areas’, March 2022
  • Genesis Owusu, tour to promote the critically acclaimed ‘Smiling With No Teeth’ album at a series of festivals in the USA and Canada including Lollapalooza Festival, Chicago, OSHEAGA Festival Musique et Arts, Montreal, This Ain’t No Picnic Festival, Los Angeles, and Austin City Limits, Austin, Texas. Alongside his festival schedule, he will be supporting Glass Animals in Nashville, Toronto and Cincinnati in July-August and supporting Khruangbin in Austin, Bentonville, Denver, Las Vegas, Mesa and Santa Fe in September-October 2022
  • Robert Andrew,  A Connective Reveal – Nagula, presented at Yokohama Triennale, July-October 2020
  • Samara Hersch,  Body of Knowledge at Home, presented at Zürcher Theater Spektakel, Zürich, August 2020; Kampnagel Sommerfestival, Hamburg, August 2020; Schwankhalle, Bremen, November 2020; Brut Theatre, Vienna, March 2021; The Theatre Practice, Singapore, April 2021; Spring Festival, Utrecht, May 2021; Impulse Theater Festival, Cologne, June 2021
  • Jamie Lewis,  The Little Old Cooking Club That Could, presented by Drama Box in Singapore, September 2020
  • Pari, P2P and P2P Ngariung, a program of virtual sharing with artist-run collectives and spaces Gudskul in Jakarta, and The White Pube in London and Liverpool, presented online, October-November 2020 and November 2021-January 2022
  • Luke George and Daniel Kok,  Hundreds + Thousands, presented at National Gallery Singapore, March 2021
  • Stephanie Lake Company, Colossus, presented at Chaillot – Théâtre national de la Danse, Paris, June 2021; Taiwan International Festival of the Arts, April 2022; Hong Kong Arts Festival, August 2022.
  • Hannah Fox, Byron J. Scullin and Tom Supple,  Siren Song, presented at Theater der Welt festival, Düsseldorf, June-July 2021
  • Kimberley Moulton, Melbourne Museum, Museums Victoria,  Naadohbii: To Draw Water, in collaboration with Pātaka Art + Museum in Wellington, and the Winnipeg Art Gallery in Winnipeg, presented at the inaugural Winnipeg Indigenous Triennial, August 2021.

Contact

If you have any other questions or need help with the application process, please contact us at international@australiacouncil.gov.au.

We acknowledge the distress, hardship and isolation felt by artists and cultural and creative workers at this time. For support contact Lifeline on 13 11 14, Beyond Blue on 1300 224 636 or Support Act on 1800 959 500.

Support Act facilitates a culturally safe experience for First Nations artists through a dedicated Helpline which is available to access any time of the day or night.

Biennale Delegates Program Participants

The program will facilitate exchange of ideas, catalyse new perspectives and support the seeding of future projects and collaborations.

About the program

A diverse group of 19 emerging creative and cultural workers from across Australia have been announced as participants of the Australia Council Biennale Delegates Program.

The program’s theme is ‘re(situate)’ and will focus on unpacking different biennale engagement approaches within an Australian and regional context. The participants will connect with artists and teams presenting the 59th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, Hawaiʻi Triennial, Documenta 15 and The Biennale of Sydney.

Participants will be guided through the program by Clothilde Bullen, Angie Abdilla, Léuli Eshrāghi, Khaled Sabsabi and Neha Kale. Through online gatherings and an in-person (NSW) residency to facilitate exchange of ideas, catalyse new perspectives and support the seeding of future projects and collaborations.

The 2022 Biennale Delegates Program is generously supported by state and territory partners including ArtsACT, Create NSW, Arts NT, Arts Queensland, Arts South Australia, Arts Tasmania and Creative Victoria and the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries – Western Australia as well as the Cross Family Foundations.

2022 Delegates:

  • Yvette Dal Pozzo (ACT) 
  • Chrischona Schmidt (NT) 
  • Rebekah Raymond (NT) 
  • Aleshia Lonsdale (NSW) 
  • Eddie Abd (NSW) 
  • Jazz Money (NSW) 
  • Riana Head-Toussaint (NSW)
  • Mandy Quadrio (QLD) 
  • Ruha Fifita (QLD)
  • Erin Davidson (SA) 
  • Rayleen Forester (SA) 
  • Sarra Tzijan (SA)
  • Theia Connell (TAS) 
  • Claire G. Coleman (VIC)  
  • Nikki Lam (VIC)
  • Sebastian Henry-Jones (VIC) 
  • Esther McDowell/Yabini Kickett (WA) 
  • Gok-Lim Finch (WA) 
  • Rachel Ciesla (WA)

 

Note: click on images below to learn more about the delegates.

International Engagement Strategy

Betty Grumble’s Enemies of Grooviness Eat Shit, produced by Performing Lines. Credit: Joseph Mayers Photography

The Australia Council is pleased to release our new International Engagement Strategy 2021-2025.  

The strategy has been informed by national and international sector consultation, and an evaluation of the activity delivered under the Australia Council’s International Arts Strategy 2015-2020.

Read and download the strategy here.

Read our Impact Report here, which presents findings and insights from the evaluation.

We are committed to supporting Australian artists, creative workers and organisations to build and sustain international connections. Our work expands opportunities for engagement through hybrid and online activities while international travel is restricted.

Our vision is for Australian arts, culture and creativity to be thriving and to be known globally for its innovation, sustainability, complexity and diversity.  

Our work strengthens the international profile, reputation, influence, and capability of the Australian cultural and creative sector. We aim to increase the discoverability, access and distribution of Australian cultural and creative content internationally and build the capability of artists to operate successfully in international contexts. 

We deliver strong and purposeful advocacy for artists, and creative and market opportunities that create value. We foster people-to-people connections, and create opportunities for cultural exchange, expertise and knowledge sharing to showcase Australian creativity, culture and identity. 

The priorities of the new strategy are, to:  

  • rethink and expand the concept of mobility through testing dynamic engagement models that include digital, hybrid and in-person connection   
  • leverage technologies and digital platforms for creation, distribution, networking, and increasing discoverability of Australian work  
  • activate borderless thinking to build reciprocal and multilateral partnerships across regions and industries, and leverage co-investment    
  • strengthen First Nations exchange that is First Nations-led and self-determined   
  • amplify Asia Pacific engagement, and the perspectives of the Asia Pacific diaspora in Australia   
  • diversify income and revenue streams to foster sustainable careers and business models by increasing access to markets, information and networks and showcase Australian work to global audiences and influencers   
  • foster risk-taking, experimentation and innovation in creation, distribution, connection and profile-building   
  • centre equity and access and reflect Australia’s diversity   
  • embed sustainability through research and investment in best-practice models and frameworks to minimise the sector’s carbon footprint.   

Underpinned by the Australia Council’s Corporate Plan priorities, our work is responsive to emergent issues, trends, practices, circumstances and disruption; and to industry needs. 

Contact 

For International Engagement Strategy enquiries: 

international@australiacouncil.gov.au 

If you are an Australian artist or arts worker overseas, please contact us if you need to discuss your situation. If you haven’t already done so, register with Smartraveller and refer to this site to see the latest updates on travel restrictions and advice. 

If you are an Australian artist or arts worker overseas and require assistance, please refer to the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade website for a list of Australian embassies, high commissions and consulates and their contact details. 

We acknowledge the distress, hardship and isolation felt by artists and arts workers at this time. For support contact Lifeline on 13 11 14, Beyond Blue on 1300 224 636 or Support Act on 1800 959 500. 

While Australian borders and many international borders have reopened, COVID-19 remains an ongoing global health risk.

Applicants should ensure duty of care, health and wellbeing, risk mitigation, travel restrictions, pre-departure testing requirements and local physical distancing measures are reviewed while planning their international activities.

Applications to the Australia Council involving international travel must consider the Australian Government’s latest travel advice. Visit Smartraveller for more details on changing travel advice levels and specific country information.

International Curators Program: Asia Pacific Triennial x TarraWarra Biennial

The Australia Council is pleased to release our new International Engagement Strategy 2021-2025.  

The strategy has been informed by national and international sector consultation, and an evaluation of the activity delivered under the Australia Council’s International Arts Strategy 2015-2020.

Read and download the strategy here.

Read our Impact Report here, which presents findings and insights from the evaluation.

We are committed to supporting Australian artists, creative workers and organisations to build and sustain international connections. Our work expands opportunities for engagement through hybrid and online activities while international travel is restricted.

Our vision is for Australian arts, culture and creativity to be thriving and to be known globally for its innovation, sustainability, complexity and diversity.  

Our work strengthens the international profile, reputation, influence, and capability of the Australian cultural and creative sector. We aim to increase the discoverability, access and distribution of Australian cultural and creative content internationally and build the capability of artists to operate successfully in international contexts. 

We deliver strong and purposeful advocacy for artists, and creative and market opportunities that create value. We foster people-to-people connections, and create opportunities for cultural exchange, expertise and knowledge sharing to showcase Australian creativity, culture and identity. 

The priorities of the new strategy are, to:  

  • rethink and expand the concept of mobility through testing dynamic engagement models that include digital, hybrid and in-person connection   
  • leverage technologies and digital platforms for creation, distribution, networking, and increasing discoverability of Australian work  
  • activate borderless thinking to build reciprocal and multilateral partnerships across regions and industries, and leverage co-investment    
  • strengthen First Nations exchange that is First Nations-led and self-determined   
  • amplify Asia Pacific engagement, and the perspectives of the Asia Pacific diaspora in Australia   
  • diversify income and revenue streams to foster sustainable careers and business models by increasing access to markets, information and networks and showcase Australian work to global audiences and influencers   
  • foster risk-taking, experimentation and innovation in creation, distribution, connection and profile-building   
  • centre equity and access and reflect Australia’s diversity   
  • embed sustainability through research and investment in best-practice models and frameworks to minimise the sector’s carbon footprint.   

Underpinned by the Australia Council’s Corporate Plan priorities, our work is responsive to emergent issues, trends, practices, circumstances and disruption; and to industry needs. 

Contact 

For International Engagement Strategy enquiries: 

international@australiacouncil.gov.au 

If you are an Australian artist or arts worker overseas, please contact us if you need to discuss your situation. If you haven’t already done so, register with Smartraveller and refer to this site to see the latest updates on travel restrictions and advice. 

If you are an Australian artist or arts worker overseas and require assistance, please refer to the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade website for a list of Australian embassies, high commissions and consulates and their contact details. 

We acknowledge the distress, hardship and isolation felt by artists and arts workers at this time. For support contact Lifeline on 13 11 14, Beyond Blue on 1300 224 636 or Support Act on 1800 959 500. 

While Australian borders and many international borders have reopened, COVID-19 remains an ongoing global health risk.

Applicants should ensure duty of care, health and wellbeing, risk mitigation, travel restrictions, pre-departure testing requirements and local physical distancing measures are reviewed while planning their international activities.

Applications to the Australia Council involving international travel must consider the Australian Government’s latest travel advice. Visit Smartraveller for more details on changing travel advice levels and specific country information.

FAQs

Yes, but the grant amount will have to be shared between nominated members of the collective and the participation shared proportionately.

The time commitment per participant is: four in-person or online gatherings between December 2021 and April 2023.

Each gathering will be between approximately two and four days long.

You will need to commit to up to 12 days of engagement with the program in total.

The program will be designed for hybrid delivery, with in-person and online activities. In-person participation in Brisbane during APT10 and Healesville during the TarraWarra Biennial are a condition of funding (subject to COVID-19 travel restrictions).

Yes, applicants will be eligible to apply for the International Engagement Fund,  for outcomes arising from program, in addition to the Australia Council’s main grants program.

Additional support relating to accessibility, interpreting and/or childcare requirements will be provided on a case by case basis. We encourage you to speak to us about any specific access needs, or support you may require to ensure you can equitably participate in this program.

HIAP – Helsinki International Artist Programme

HIAP is the largest international residency centre in the Nordic and Baltic region

Image caption: HIAP Suomenlinna. Credit: Sirja Moberg.

About the residency

Location: Helsinki, Finland

Art form: First Nations Arts, Community Arts and Cultural Development, Dance, Emerging and Experimental Arts, Literature, Music, Theatre, Visual Arts

Grant amount: $10,000

Website: HIAP

Founded in 1998, HIAP – Helsinki International Artist Programme is the largest international residency centre in the Nordic and Baltic region. Every year up to 40 artists and arts professionals residing in Finland and abroad are offered a working period at HIAP. The residency durations range from one month (curatorial residencies) to three months (international residencies), and up to 11 months (local residencies). The program offers time and space for open-ended research and experimentation, without the requirement to produce finalised work. The HIAP residency venues are located on Suomenlinna island, a UNESCO World Heritage Site located a 15-minute ferry ride away from the centre of Helsinki, and in the Cable Factory cultural complex in Helsinki.

The HIAP residency program focuses on visual arts, however, it is open to artists and curators from various disciplines. Collaborating with local and international partner organisations, residencies extend to such creative fields as dance, theatre, literature, and music. The activities are organised predominantly through thematic residency programs that highlight a geographical area or concentrate on a specific contemporary topic or an aspect of artistic practice.

The HIAP residency program offers time and support for developing new work in dialogue with the local art scene. The goal is to offer space for experimental, cross-disciplinary art practices and to actively contribute to topical debates within and around the context of art.

The HIAP team and supporting curators help the residents with their research as well as practical everyday matters. Residents have access to services such as weekly residency community meetings, access to facilities and equipment, meetings with a supporting curator and the option to take part in the HIAP Open Studios event. This normally takes place towards the end of each residency season and is an opportunity to present work-in-progress to arts professionals and the general public.

Resources to help strengthen your application and maximise your residency experience can be found here.

Information pack: Download PDF.

Meet this year’s participants

Sarah Rodigari

Sarah Rodigari

Sarah Rodigari is a Sydney-based artist whose practice addresses the social and political potential of art. Sarah’s work is site responsive, employing durational live action, improvisation, and dialogical methodologies to produce text-based performance, installations and video. Rodigari has worked with and within various contexts and institutions. These include the National: New Australia Art, Museum of Contemporary Art (Sydney), the 20th Biennale of Sydney, Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne International Arts Festival, ACCA, The Poetry Project (NYC) and SOMA (Mexico City). Rodigari holds a PhD in Creative Arts from the University of Wollongong and is a member of the collective Field Theory.

Image credit: Jacquie Manning

Make or Break

Make or Break

Make or Break devise and experiment with process-based projects that are co-authored with communities they are invited into. These have included creating experimental economies and temporary currencies; caring for civic spaces and the ‘nonhuman’; celebrating the labour of strangers; prototyping for future worlds; writing speculative fiction and facilitating conversations as collective research. Make or Break is Rebecca Gallo and Connie Anthes, who work and live on the stolen lands of the Gadigal and Bidjigal in Sydney, Australia. They acknowledge First Nations sovereignty and their continuing care for Country, Sky, and Water. www.makeorbreakart.com

Image credit: Dean Tirkot

Helen Svoboda

Helen Svoboda

Helen Svoboda is a double bassist, vocalist, and composer. Her work explores the melodic potential of the contemporary double bass, intricately weaving extended techniques and overtones amidst abstract song writing and nature-themed compositions.

Helen lived and studied in the Netherlands/Germany from 2018-20. She has performed with artists and organisations including Cory Smythe, Sebastian Gramss, the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, and the Australian Art Orchestra. She was awarded the 2020 Freedman Jazz Fellowship, was the recipient of the 2020/21 Australian Art Orchestra Pathfinders Music Leadership Program and is currently studying a PhD in composition under the tutelage of Cat Hope at Monash University.

In line with her active performance career, Helen has released albums across her own original projects, including ‘Vegetable Bass’ (2020) and ‘Since Subito’ (Meatshell, 2021). As a composer her commissions include works for solo guitar and viola, alongside a collection of her own scores which are published online in the Contrabass Conversations Online Music Library.

Image credit: Celeste de Clario

  • Only individuals or groups of two may apply to this category.
  • You must be a practicing artist or arts worker and an Australian citizen or an Australian permanent resident.

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply if:

  • You received a grant, or administered a grant, from the Australia Council in the past and that grant has not been satisfactorily acquitted
  • You owe money to the Australia Council
  • We will not accept applications from legally constituted organisations.

Australia Council staff will consider applications according to the assessment criteria and will seek recommendations by industry advisors as needed. Successful applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by late September 2022.

Applicants must address the following assessment criteria:

  1. Artistic merit
  • suitability of your practice to the residency program and its artistic environment/offer
  • quality of work previously produced, and public and peer response to your work
  1. Viability
  • suitability of your proposal to the residency program
  • the skills and artistic ability of your collaborators and their relevance to the proposed activity
  • realistic and achievable planning, resource use and evaluation.
  1. Impact on career
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your artistic practice
  • the relevance and timeliness of the proposed activity
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your capacity as an arts professional, particularly in relation to international development and collaboration.

You should submit support material with your application. Assessors may review this support material to help them gain a better sense of your project.

What you should provide

We do not accept application-related support material submitted via post. Application-related material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your support material online, or need advice on what type of material to submit, please contact Ellen Dwyer, International Market Adviser, Europe on +61 02 9215 9051 or e.dwyer@australiacouncil.gov.au.

There are three types of support material you may submit:

1. Artistic support material

This should include relevant, recent examples of your artistic or cultural work.

Types of support material we accept

Our preferred method of receiving support material is via URLs (weblinks).

You can provide up to three URLs (weblinks) that link to content that is relevant to your proposal. This may include video, audio, images, or written material.

These URLs can include a total of:

  • 10 minutes of video and/or audio recording
  • 10 images
  • 10 pages of written material (for example, excerpts of literary writing).

Please note: Our assessors will not access any URLs that require them to log in or sign up to a platform. Please do not provide links to Spotify or other applications that require users to log in or pay for access.

If you are linking to media files that are private or password protected like Vimeo, please provide the password in the password field on the application form.

Other accepted file formats

If you cannot supply support material via URLs, you may upload support material to your application in the following formats:

  • video (MP4, QuickTime, and Windows Media)
  • audio (MP3 and Windows Media)
  • images (JPEG and PowerPoint)
  • written material (Word and PDF).

2. Biographies and CVs

You can include a brief bio or curriculum vitae (CV) for key artists, personnel or other collaborators involved in your project.

Brief bios or CV information should be presented as a single document no longer than two A4 pages in total.

3. Letters of support

Individuals, groups, or organisations can write letters in support of your project. A support letter should explain how the project or activity will benefit you, other artists or arts professionals, participants, or the broader community. It can also detail the support or involvement of key project partners, or evidence of consultation.

If relevant to your activity, letters of support must provide evidence of appropriate permissions and support from First Nations organisations, communities, and Elders. Please refer to the First Nations Protocols for more information.

You can include up to five letters of support, with each letter not exceeding one A4 page.

The selected residents stay in a HIAP Suomenlinna atelier apartment. The residency spaces are in the Palmstierna studio complex, a renovated two-storey red-brick barrack from the 18th century, currently housing nine residential units (five atelier apartments and four regular apartments) and one workspace for artists.

The HIAP Suomenlinna atelier apartments are approx. 80 sqm each, furnished, and divided into a working space downstairs and a separate living space with bathroom and fully equipped kitchenette upstairs. The atelier apartments feature two single beds and a sofa-bed and can accommodate up to three persons. Bedding, linen, and towels are provided. The atelier apartments have a wireless internet connection. You can see some of the residency spaces here.

It is possible to access the ground floor of the HIAP atelier apartments, office, Gallery Augusta & Project Space by wheelchair, but HIAP recommend wheelchair users be accompanied by a person assisting because the entrance doors are not step-free. The living area of the two-story atelier apartments is accessible only via staircase (approx. 19 steps), and not accessible by wheelchair. The toilets are not spacious enough to meet accessibility standards. Despite this, HIAP are happy to help you plan your residency. Please contact HIAP to discuss your access needs and receive additional information. You can also find further details on accessibility in the information pack.

Family members and guests are welcome in all HIAP’s locations. The atelier apartment can accommodate a family of two adults with up to two small children. Please note that pets are not allowed in the rooms.

Your application must comply with the following Protocols. We may contact you to request further information during the assessment process, or if successful, as a condition of your funding.

Protocols for using First Nations Cultural and Intellectual Property in the Arts

All applications involving First Nations artists, communities or subject matter must adhere to these Protocols, provide evidence of this in their application and support material. More information on the First Nations Protocols is available here.

Commonwealth Child Safe Framework

All successful applicants are required to comply with all Australian law relating to employing or engaging people who work or volunteer with children, including working with children checks and mandatory reporting. Successful organisations who provide services directly to children, or whose funded activities involve contact with children, will additionally be required to implement the National Principles for Child Safe Organisations.

2021-2022

  • Francoise Lane is a Torres Strait Islander woman whose maternal family are from Kerriri and descendant of the Meriam and Kaurareg people of the Torres Strait Islands. She is a qualified interior designer with a Bachelor of Built Environment (Interior Design) from the Queensland University of Technology. Together with her husband Andrew Lane they are Indij Architecture and Design; a 100% Indigenous owned award winning architectural and design practice based in Cairns and operating since 2011. As an interior designer, textile designer and artist she describes her work as straddling the intersection between design and art including exhibition curation and leading creative art projects.
  • Sumugan Sivanesan is an anti-disciplinary artist and researcher, whose interests span migrant histories, minority politics, activist media, artist infrastructures and more-than-human rights. He was a Kone Foundation fellow over 2020–21, initiating an artistic research project, ‘fugitive radio’, as a platform for migrant, queer and anticolonial issues and music in Helsinki (and beyond), in collaboration with Pixelache Helsinki. At HIAP, Sumugan will develop installation and live art formats for fugitive radio, and further collaborations with representatives from diverse communities and organisations in Finland.

2020-2021

  • Rebekah (Bek) Berger
  • Joshua Pether

2019-2020

  • Rhiannon Newton
  • Judith Hamann
  • Sarah Aiken
  • Courtney Coombs

2018-2019

  • Loren Kronemyer
  • Lisa Hilli
  • Tamara Searle
  • Caitlin Yardley

2017-2018

  • Laith McGregor
  • Tessa Rapaport
  • Natalie Abbott
  • Matt Shilcock

Frequently Asked Questions

Unless stated otherwise in the program description, all residencies are offered for fixed dates and periods of time.

Yes, but this will be at your own cost and the Australia Council will not be able to provide additional funds towards the extension.

No. You are not required to provide a budget with your application.

There is no requirement for you to provide a timetable of your activities, unless stated otherwise in the individual residency program guidelines.

Yes. If successful, you are required to take out travel insurance for the duration of your residency. It is recommended you pay for this from your grant.

The capacity to accommodate children and partners varies for different residencies. Please check the program descriptions for specific requirements. Please note that the programs are limited to the participating artist only and have various limitations e.g. communal living and/or working space or modest living quarters.

Yes, the grant to an individual that accompanies a residency is considered income and taxable. Please visit the Australian Taxation Office website for more information.

The International Residencies Program is dynamic and responsive and the programs on offer may vary from year to year.

Yes. If you are looking for some tips on organising your residency or programs in the region you’re interested in, check out the resources on our International Residencies Program web page.

There is no limit to the number of applications you can submit to the International Residencies Program. However, you will need to consider how the assessors will perceive your commitment to a particular residency program and/or market if you have applied for multiple residencies. Each residency requires you to submit a separate application form. Please note, applications to International Development funding opportunities do not count as an application to the Australia Council Grants Program.

Yes, as long as you have satisfactorily acquitted the previous residency grant.

The grant is not intended to cover lost income or rent at home and applicants will need to consider their capacity to undertake the residency prior to applying.

The Australia Council partners with established and reputable residency providers and each program is unique. Successful applicants will be provided with detailed information about each residency and introductions to the residency providers who will assist artists with making local connections. Australia Council staff are able to provide further advice and contacts, as requested. Australia Council’s International Development Consultants, across Asia, Europe, and North America, are also available as an additional resource. Artists are also expected to have their own resources, contacts and project plans for the residency.

The grant is a contribution from the Australia Council toward your travel (including airfares and travel insurance) and living costs during the residency period. Applicants are expected to research the cost of living in the residency location they are travelling to. You may need to supplement the grant with your own funds depending on your projected costs for the residency period.

No. The Australia Council cannot provide any advice on visa or immigration matters. You must contact the relevant country’s visa service to get current information. We suggest you allow plenty of time to apply for all international visas.

Accessibility varies for different residencies. Please check the program descriptions for specific requirements. Please contact the relevant adviser listed in the guidelines to discuss your access needs for these and other programs available through the International Residencies Program.