Digital Transformation for the Creative Industries

A six-week, online short course providing insight into digital strategy and new technologies.

Image: tuylupaby pakana kanaplila and Soma Lumia. Presented by Tasdance and Mona Foma, in collaboration with Theatre Royal. Credit: Jillian Mundy

About the program

Digital Transformation for the Creative Industries is an online short course designed specifically for artists and arts and creative workers it is best suited for those with a beginner or intermediate understanding of the digital space as it relates to the creative industries.

Developed and delivered in collaboration with the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), this six-week course will give you an insight into key digital concepts, modes of digital practice, emergent technologies and also introduce ideas around digital strategy and business model innovation.

As a leading Australian university and a top-ranked university in Australia, UTS is home to industry-connected educators and researchers who are leaders in their creative fields, and passionate about organisational and individual skills development and uplift.

Curated by arts and cultural practitioners, Digital Transformation for the Creative Industries is specifically designed for artists and creative practitioners, arts administrators, managers, and directors working, whether independent, or from organisations large or small who want to begin to understand digital practice and strategy.

You will join a cohort of industry peers and colleagues working in different artforms across Australia to understand, explore and shape your thinking around digital. Key topics include:

  • Understanding key digital concepts
  • Digital practices for the arts
  • Digital transformation strategy
  • Digital leadership
  • Digital business models
  • Demystifying emerging technologies.

This six-week course requires a commitment of up to four hours a week, and is a combination of facilitated sessions, online group learning and self-directed activities that can be directly applied to your existing work and practice.

In collaboration with:

This course is for artists and creative practitioners, arts administrators, managers, and directors working in organisations or independently in the arts and creative industry. Participants will work in a range of artforms around Australia.

  • Participants must be over 18 years of age.
  • Participants must be based within Australia to partake in the first round. Positions will be open to international artists and arts workers from the second round onwards.

The Australia Council encourages applications from people who identify as First Nations, from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, people with disability and people living in regional and remote areas.

This course is digitally accessible and follows the AAA standards. Please get in touch if you have any specific access requirements.

Applications for subsidised positions in the first three cohorts closed on Tuesday 2 August.

Applications for subsidised positions in the first three cohorts closed on  Tuesday 7 February, 3pm (AEST).

The course will run for six weeks, beginning with an introductory session the week prior to commencement. Five cohorts of participants will be accepted in the March – June 2023 sessions:

  • 13 March – 21 April 2023
  • 8 May – 16 June 2023

Positions in the first three rounds of the Digital Transformation for the Creative Industries course are subsidised as part of the Digital Culture Program.

Tiered subsidies are available to support access for a diversity of participants:

  • Independent artists/practitioner – A $600 subsidy is available. Participants will be required to pay $75
  • Small to medium arts organisations – $300 subsidy available for representatives from. Participants will be required to pay $375
  • Large organisations/institutions – The overall course fee of $675 (ex GST) applies

If your subsidy application is unsuccessful, you can choose to pay the course fee in full. The overall course fee is $675 (ex GST).

Subsidised positions are limited. Subsidy applications will be assessed to ensure an equitable spread of participants across artform, location and priority areas.

If your application is successful, we will contact you with payment and onboarding information.

Please complete the online application form to select your preferred course dates, and apply for a subsidy (if eligible).

If your application is successful, we will contact you for payment details and pass on your details to UTS for enrolment.

Frequently asked questions

This course is designed to support arts and creative practitioners to embrace a digital mindset and to enable digital innovation within the sector.

The course is delivered in partnership with University of Technology Sydney (UTS) and will draw on expert knowledge and experience to build the digital literacy and capacity of the creative industries.

Through the ‘Digital Transformation for Creative Industries’ course, participants will:

  • Gain the knowledge and ability to assess the digital strengths and priorities of their practice or organisation.
  • Identify and implement digital practices, workflows and platforms to gain efficiencies and digital workflows.
  • Be able to develop, mobilise and implement a relevant and customised organisation-wide digital strategy.
  • Be able to apply adaptive architecture principles to enable digital innovation and transformation.

The course will be facilitated by leading creatives and academics from the UTS team, with a range of guest speakers and facilitators from across artforms and across Australia.

This course is for artists and creative practitioners, arts administrators, managers, and directors working in organisations or independently in the arts and creative industry. Participants will work in a range of artforms around Australia.

best suited for those with a beginner or intermediate understanding of the digital space as it relates to the creative industries. There is not a requirement for an existing high-level of technological skills or understanding to undertake the course. The course will focus on digital mindsets, literacy and strategic development.

The course is six weeks and requires up to four hours of your time each week.

The course includes self-directed reading, activities and online content as well as one hour of group learning and discussion with a facilitator every week.

The course is delivered on UTS online learning platform Canvas. Details of how to access, use and navigate the platform will be provided on enrolment.

For any questions or further information about the Digital Culture Program please email digitalarts@australiacouncil.gov.au or call 02 9215 9036.

ProtoX Arts Digital Accelerator Program

A 12-week mentoring program for artists, groups and organisations to develop new digital business ideas.

 
Register for our information session on Wednesday 25 January, 12.30-1.30pm AEDT.
 


 

About the opportunity

Australia Council for the Arts is collaborating with INCUBATE, the University of Sydney’s Flagship Startup Program, to deliver ProtoX Arts – a national 12-week Digital Accelerator Program for individual artists, groups and arts organisations. Through 1:1 mentoring, industry connections and weekly goal-setting, ProtoX Arts provides the subject matter expertise to empower members of the arts community to pursue their digitally centred ideas into businesses.

This program supports emerging creative founders and the broader ecosystem by teaching key foundational business frameworks and enabling connections into the startup community. Additionally, hands-on customer testing, prototyping, and iterating are encouraged to build founders and businesses that service the arts and creative sectors.

Taking part in this Accelerator Program will equip you with the knowledge, skills and confidence to pursue your startup idea.

This program is designed to support digitally centred business and product ideas such as plug-ins, media players, immersive VR/AR experiences, apps, platforms and programs, that originated out of, or support the creative industries.

Image credit: Amrita Hepi, Open Poses (detail), 2022. Installation view, Primavera 2022: YoungAustralian Artists, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney, 2022. Datasetfor pose recognition, custom software, webcam, monitors, decal, lamps, paintedwall, sound. Image courtesy the artist and Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, ©the artist. Photograph: Anna Kučera

This opportunity is open for arts-aligned/creative industries organisations and individuals.

Applications will be reviewed by staff and industry advisors. Your application will be based on merit, response to the selection criteria below, and in line with Australia Council’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.

  1. Timeliness and relevance of the training opportunity to your professional development
  2. The impact the proposed activity will have on your career
  3. Viability of the proposed project

You will be asked to provide your biography and most up to date CV.

Frequently asked questions

To apply, you will need to answer the following questions:

  • What problem are you solving and why is it worth solving?
  • Can you share a time in your career (either as a freelancer or an employee) where you experienced this (or a similar) problem and how you fixed this problem?
  • Why do you think now is the time to test this idea? Do you have a unique insight into the market?

A problem can be a time-consuming task, a breakdown in process or an expensive way of doing something simple. If you’ve ever thought “there has to be a simpler or better way” you’ve identified a problem.

This residency is designed to be delivered online. Over 12 weekly 2 hour sessions, (Wednesday 5pm-7pm) and with access to 2 additional hours per week to work with mentors and Entrepreneurs-in-Residence.

This program is for arts-aligned/creative industries individuals and organisations who have an idea for a digital product, have found a solution to a problem or see a gap in the market that they can fill. Product ideas may include as plug-ins, media players, immersive VR/AR experiences, apps, platforms and programs, that originated out of, or support the creative industries.

Not all participants in the program may end up taking their product to market after exploring the viability of the project through the program, however all participants will leave the program with new skills in product development, entrepreneurship and business, which they can take to their next project.

This program will be delivered online.

Please email digital@australiacouncil.gov.au if you would like more information.

Digital Skills Program × Melbourne International Games Week

5-7 October 2022

About this opportunity

The Australia Council is pleased to announce the Digital Skills Program × Melbourne International Games Week.

The Digital Skills Program is a series of workshops, seminars and intensives that focus on using digital and emerging technologies to develop creative practice.

As part of this program we’re offering 6 artists and digital practitioners the chance to experience a selection of the Melbourne International Games week program over three days. The program includes flights to Melbourne, 2 nights accommodation, a per diem and tickets to industry events.

This opportunity is designed for artists and creative practitioners who are already creating work in the digital space or related fields and would like to expand their knowledge of the gaming sector and technologies.

Read more about Melbourne International Games Week here.

This opportunity is designed for artists and creative practitioners who are already creating work in the digital space including but not limited to animators, story board artists, illustrators, composers and sound designers.

Applications will be reviewed by staff and industry advisors. Your application will be based on merit, response to the selection criteria below, and in line with Australia Council’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.

You will need to answer the following questions:

  • Tell us about your creative practice and how you work with digital technologies?
  • Why is this opportunity right for you at this time?
  • Are you available on the 5-7 of October?

Click on the ‘Apply now’ button, or on this link.

Please indicate on the application form if you have any accessibility requirements.

Venice Biennale 2024: expressions of interest for artistic proposals

Opportunity for Australian artists and curators to present a ground-breaking and ambitious exhibition within the Australia Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2024.

Australia Pavilion.

Watch the recording of the information session

In this webinar held on Monday, 26 September, we provided an overview of the stage one process.

About the opportunity

Expressions of interest (EOI) are now open for artistic proposals to represent Australia in the category of National Participation for the 60th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia (Venice Biennale 2024).

The Venice Biennale is a significant platform that allows Australian contemporary art to be known globally for its innovation, sustainability, complexity, and diversity. Australia’s participation in the Venice Biennale provides Australian artists and curators with a high-profile international opportunity that includes important international exposure to new audiences, markets, and contexts. This exposure builds the profile of Australian contemporary art and stimulates international cultural links, networks and dialogue for Australian artists and curators.

Australia Council for the Arts is the commissioner in the category of National Participation for the Venice Biennale. In 2024 the Council will be the producing manager of the exhibition. The successful artistic team will work in close collaboration with the Australia Council from concept through to the development, launch and deinstallation.

The Venice Biennale typically runs for seven months, from May to November 2024.

Shortlisted applicants from the expressions of interest will be invited to submit a detailed proposal later this year (Stage Two). The successful artistic team will be announced in early 2023.

We are looking for an artistic team with the concept, credentials, and experience to exhibit in the Australia Pavilion for the Venice Biennale 2024.

A shortlisted proposal will include an artistic concept that is:

  • creatively ambitious
  • engaged with contemporary visual art discourse and global conversations
  • responsive to the architecture of the Australia Pavilion, and
  • considerate of the audiences who visit the Venice Biennale.

Proposals may focus on presenting one artist or relate to a number of artists and their practice. Similarly, proposals may include one curator or a number of curators.

Artist Fellowship

The artist/s representing Australia in the Pavilion will receive the Venice Artist Fellowship of $100,000 to develop, create, and produce new artwork(s) for the exhibition in the Australia Pavilion. Additional support towards travel and accommodation in Venice will be provided.

Curator Fellowship

The curator/s representing Australia will receive the Venice Curator Fellowship of $50,000 to provide curatorial direction for the exhibition, working closely with the Australia Council as the producer. Additional support towards travel and accommodation in Venice will be provided.

General Support

An exhibition budget covering freight and equipment, fabrication, Pavilion operations and maintenance, install and deinstall, PR and marketing will be managed by the Australia Council as the producer.

Only individuals and groups may apply to this opportunity. All members of the artistic team must be Australian citizens or Australian permanent residents and practicing artists or arts professionals.

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply for this opportunity if:

  • you have already applied to this opportunity in a separate proposal
  • you have an overdue grant report
  • you owe money to the Australia Council
  • you are an organisation.

Your EOI must address three assessment criteria.

First Criterion | Quality

The panel will assess the quality of the artistic proposal. They will consider:

  • vision, ideas, and artistic rationale
  • level of innovation, ambition, experimentation or risk-taking.

Second Criterion | Viability

The panel will assess the viability of the artistic proposal. They will consider:

  • skills and ability of artist/s and curator/s involved, and relevance to the proposal
  • evidence that you have considered and addressed audience engagement and access associated with your artistic proposal.

Third Criterion | Timeliness

The panel will assess the timeliness of the artistic proposal. They will consider:

  • the proposal’s contribution and relevance to contemporary art discourse both in Australia and Internationally.

Successful EOI applicants will be asked to submit a detailed proposal later this year (Stage Two) based on the advice of a panel of independent industry advisors including national and international visual arts experts. The names of the panelists will be published when the successful Stage Two proposal is publicly announced.

The questions we will ask in the application form include:

  • a title for your proposal
  • the names of the proposed artist/s and curator/s
    *do not list names of any technicians, consultants or any other collaborator supporting your proposal.
  • a short overview of your proposal
  • attachment of three essential and one optional support material items will be required, including a two-page artistic proposal, biographies and curriculum vitae of all members of the artistic team and examples of previous work.

You must submit support material with your application. The panel will review this support material to help them gain a better sense of your proposal.

We do not accept application-related support material submitted via post. Application-related material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your support material online or need advice on what type of material to submit, please contact the Venice Biennale Project Team.

There are four types of support material you must submit:

  1. Artistic Proposal

A maximum two (2) page, A4 PDF document titled *titleofproposal_ArtisticProposal_VeniceBiennale2024

Minimum font size must be 11pt, sans serif.

This document should address the three assessment criteria outlined in these guidelines and provide a summary of your artistic proposal for the Australia Pavilion.

*You are not required to submit visuals or a realised exhibition concept in this EOI Stage One.

  1. Curriculum Vitae

A maximum one (1) page per individual, A4 PDF document titled *titleofproposal_CV_VeniceBiennale2024

Minimum font size must be 11pt, sans serif.

This document should include a short bio of each member, illustrate relevant experience and practice achievements of each member.

  1. Artistic support material

A maximum four (4) pages per artist, A4 PDF document titled *titleofproposal_previouswork_VeniceBiennale2024

Minimum font size must be 11pt, sans serif.

This document should include images and brief overview text of previous work. Do not include web links in this document.

  1. Letter of support from gallery (optional)

If you are affiliated with a commercial gallery, please provide a letter of support from them outlining the nature of their support towards your participation. An individual letter can be submitted for each artist forming part of the team.

If you are not affiliated with a commercial gallery, you do not need to submit this letter.

CINARS 2022 Biennale

Blood on the Dance Floor by Jacob Boehme. Credit: Dorine Blaise.

About the program

Established in 1984, taking place every two years, CINARS is one of the most important international showcases and networking events attracting over 1900 performing arts professionals from around the globe.

The Australia Council will support a delegation to attend this event. We also welcome any Australian artists and companies attending on a self-funded basis to join the delegation and any related networking activities.

More details on the event can be found on the CINARS website.

Funding

Australia Council will support 10 delegates with $4,000 each, towards the cost of travel. These supported delegates will be responsible for all costs associated with attending the market including flights, visas, insurance, accommodation and registration.

Who can apply

  • This opportunity is for Australian-based artists and/or producers working independently or within organisations.

Who can’t apply

You can’t apply for this grant if:

  • you have an overdue grant report
  • you owe money to the Australia Council.

Applicants are required to respond to the following assessment criteria:

  1. The impact of attendance at CINARS in developing future international opportunities and enhancing international visibility.
  2. Demonstrated understanding of and commitment to the region and market.
  3. The timeliness of this opportunity and demonstrated ability to plan and deliver on any international outcomes that may arise.

Your application will be reviewed by Australia Council staff and industry advisers against the assessment criteria.

Applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by late September 2022.

No supporting material is required for this application.

Digital Skills Program × Melbourne International Games Week

5-7 October 2022

About this opportunity

The Australia Council is pleased to announce the Digital Skills Program × Melbourne International Games Week.

The Digital Skills Program is a series of workshops, seminars and intensives that focus on using digital and emerging technologies to develop creative practice.

As part of this program we’re offering 6 artists and digital practitioners the chance to experience a selection of the Melbourne International Games week program over three days. The program includes flights to Melbourne, 2 nights accommodation, a per diem and tickets to industry events.

This opportunity is designed for artists and creative practitioners who are already creating work in the digital space or related fields and would like to expand their knowledge of the gaming sector and technologies.

Read more about Melbourne International Games Week here.

This opportunity is designed for artists and creative practitioners who are already creating work in the digital space including but not limited to animators, story board artists, illustrators, composers and sound designers.

Applications will be reviewed by staff and industry advisors. Your application will be based on merit, response to the selection criteria below, and in line with Australia Council’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.

You will need to answer the following questions:

  • Tell us about your creative practice and how you work with digital technologies?
  • Why is this opportunity right for you at this time?
  • Are you available on the 5-7 of October?

Click on the ‘Apply now’ button, or on this link.

Please indicate on the application form if you have any accessibility requirements.

Frequently asked questions

Over a three month period, the program is delivered in three phases. Your organisation will work with the strategist to complete the following:

  • Assess: the strategist will take the organisation through the Digital Culture Compass, an online tool that will help identify the organisation’s current level of digital maturity.
  • Develop: a process of ideation and investigation to identify digital challenges and opportunities for your organisation. This phase involves feasibility research to refine and resolve potential initiatives.
  • Draft: collate your work into a digital strategy (and/or implementation plan) document that aligns with your existing strategic/business plan.

Our digital strategists are a diverse group of creative technologists and digital consultants with a broad range of experience across digital technologies, capacities and roles. Strategists will be located across Australia and are selected based on their:

  • experience with digital transformation
  • knowledge of the arts and creative industry
  • commitment to digital inclusion, cultural competency and accessibility.

Organisations will be matched with strategists based on the individual needs and priority areas.

This residency is designed to be delivered online with potential for hybrid delivery, involving a combination of in-person and online sessions with your strategist via negotiation.

Proposal documents should include the following:

  • A written response outlining how the individual, company or organisation proposes to meet the requirement of the project (no more than two pages).
  • A breakdown of your quote, including availability and capacity to deliver the requirements within the budget requirements of this document (refer part B6). Your quote must include and note GST where applicable.
  • Individual, company or organisation information such as corporate status, registered place of business, size, number of staff and insurance policies.
  • Qualifications of the staff to be designated to the project.
  • Two referees to whom the Australia Council may address enquiries concerning previous experience in this area.
  • A declaration of any partial or non-compliance with any provisions of this RFP. This includes not agreeing to any of the draft conditions of contract stating reasons and alternatives where appropriate.

Digital Skills Program × Melbourne International Games Week

5-7 October 2022

About this opportunity

The Australia Council is pleased to announce the Digital Skills Program × Melbourne International Games Week.

The Digital Skills Program is a series of workshops, seminars and intensives that focus on using digital and emerging technologies to develop creative practice.

As part of this program we’re offering 6 artists and digital practitioners the chance to experience a selection of the Melbourne International Games week program over three days. The program includes flights to Melbourne, 2 nights accommodation, a per diem and tickets to industry events.

This opportunity is designed for artists and creative practitioners who are already creating work in the digital space or related fields and would like to expand their knowledge of the gaming sector and technologies.

Read more about Melbourne International Games Week here.

This opportunity is designed for artists and creative practitioners who are already creating work in the digital space including but not limited to animators, story board artists, illustrators, composers and sound designers.

Applications will be reviewed by staff and industry advisors. Your application will be based on merit, response to the selection criteria below, and in line with Australia Council’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.

You will need to answer the following questions:

  • Tell us about your creative practice and how you work with digital technologies?
  • Why is this opportunity right for you at this time?
  • Are you available on the 5-7 of October?

Click on the ‘Apply now’ button, or on this link.

Please indicate on the application form if you have any accessibility requirements.

Additional information

Once you submit your application, we will send you an email acknowledging receipt of your application.

After you submit your application, we first check it meets the eligibility criteria for the grant or opportunity to which you are applying.

Applications to the Australia Council Grant Programs are assessed by arts practice peer panels against the published assessment criteria for the relevant grant program.

We aim to notify you of the outcome of your application no later than 12 weeks after the published closing date for the applicable grant round.

Once all applications have been assessed, you will be contacted about the outcome of your application. If you have been successful, you will also be sent a funding agreement. This outlines the conditions of funding, how you will be paid and your grant reporting requirements. The following accordion items outline these stages in more detail.

If your application is successful, you will receive an email advising you a grant is offered. You must then agree to the conditions of your grant, which represents the Australia Council’s contract with you – this can be done online, by email or by letter. Payment of a grant will not be made until the grant conditions have been agreed and accepted by all the relevant parties.

You should not start a project that depends on a grant until all relevant parties have agreed and accepted the grant conditions and we have evidence of such acceptance on file.

Standard grant conditions require you to, among other things:

  • seek prior approval for making a change to a funded project (for example, changes in the activity budget; changes to key creative personnel; or changes to start or end dates)
  • respond to requests for information about the project or grant
  • satisfactorily account for how the grant is spent (if you do not you will be required to return all monies for which you cannot satisfactorily account)
  • comply with all applicable laws
  • acknowledge the Australia Council’s support in all promotional material associated with the project; this includes use of the Australia Council’s logo and a standard text of acknowledgement.
  • provide artistic and financial acquittal reports at the end of the project
  • return any unspent grant funds at the completion of your project or on notice from us to return such unspent funds.

Grant agreements must be signed by a legal entity – either a legally constituted organisation or an individual. For unincorporated groups, see the section on administered grants

All individual or organisation grant applicants based in Australia must have an ABN. Individual applicants without an ABN may have their grant administered by an individual or organisation with an ABN. Organisations operating outside of Australia do not need an ABN to apply. Individuals based outside of Australia may not need an ABN to apply, depending on their circumstances (please check with your accountant or tax advisor).

The name of the applicant must match the name of the ABN and the name of the bank account into which we pay the funds. There are no exceptions to this rule. If applicants cannot provide an ABN and bank account that are in the same name as the applicant’s name, they will need to nominate an administrator for their grant.

Groups/ensembles/collectives, unincorporated associations/ unincorporated entities and other bodies with no legal status do not need an administrator if they have an active Australian Business Number (ABN) and bank account in their name. If they are unable to provide an active ABN and bank account that matches the name of the applicant, they must nominate an administrator. The name of the administrator must match the name of the ABN and bank account into which funds are paid if the application is successful.

If we approve your application you will need accept the conditions of the grant in a funding agreement.

After you accept your funding agreement online, we will automatically generate a payment for the grant on your behalf. You do not need to send us an invoice.

We will pay grant funds directly into your nominated bank account within two weeks after acceptance of the funding agreement. Grant payments cannot be postponed.

If you do not wish to have the grant funds paid directly into your bank account you can choose to have your grant administered by another individual or legally constituted organisation (Doesn’t apply to Arts Projects – Organisations).

When you apply, you will be asked to provide an active Australian Business Number or ‘ABN’. The ABN that you provide must correspond to the name of the applicant (or the administering body, if one has been nominated). When you accept your funding agreement, you will be asked to enter the details of the bank account you wish the grant to be paid into. The name associated with that bank account must correspond to the name in which the ABN has been registered.

Download the Australia Council for the Arts logo guidelines here.

Download the Major Festivals Initiative logo guidelines here.

Grant reports are required on completion of your project. Acquitting a grant means accurately reporting on the funded activities and the expenditure of Australia Council funding.

Please read your funding agreement to check details of the grant acquittal material you should provide.

The grant acquittal report is where you tell us:

  • how you spent your grant
  • what the artistic outcomes of your funded activity were.

If you do not provide a satisfactory grant report at the times and in the manner detailed in your funding agreement, the Australia Council will not make any further payments that may be due to you, and you will not be eligible  to apply for further grants.

If you do not provide a satisfactory grant report, the Australia Council may ask you to pay back all or part of the funding provided to you.

Grant reports are used by the Australia Council to fulfil obligations of accountability to the Australian Government. They are also essential to the development work of the Australia Council. The reports help us evaluate the achievements of funded activities, monitor the effectiveness of grant categories and ensure our policy development is consistent with the experience of artists in the field.

Reporting for Multi-year Funded Organisations

Organisations in receipt of multi-year funding are required to submit financial, statistical, and artistic reporting on an annual basis.

All reporting is submitted online via the Australia Council’s arts organisations reporting system.

If you are not sure what reporting you need to submit as part of your annual reporting, or what information to provide, please get in touch with your Australia Council contact.

All recipients must acknowledge that the Australia Council provided funding for their activities. When you acquit your grant, we will ask you how you acknowledged the Australia Council.

For printed or online material use our logo and this phrase:

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body OR The (company name) is assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

Logos for download and guidelines for the use of our logos.

Where projects do not have a public outcome, or do not produce any printed or online material, you will need to think about how best to acknowledge the Australia Council funding.

Frequently asked questions

You will receive your grant payment within two weeks of accepting your funding agreement. Please note we pay our grants in the financial year which they are approved. We will not adjust payment timelines to the particular circumstances of individuals. 

The deadline for applications is at 3:00pm AET on the closing date. We strongly recommend submitting before this. Administrative and technical support is only available during office hours (Monday-Friday) 9am to 5 pm AET. Late applications will not be accepted. 

Yes, if you have support materials such as letters from project partners, collaborators or participants that are in languages other than English (including Auslan), we can arrange translation or captioning. 

Please contact the Artists Services team at least four weeks before the closing date of the grant round to which you are intending to make an application. If you do not contact us at least four weeks before the closing date, we may not have sufficient time to meet your translation needs. 

Our online application form also has a checkbox at the top which you can tick if you have attached materials in a language other than English. This alerts the Artists Services team that you have submitted these materials. 

We do not accept applications submitted via post. Any material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your application online, please contact Artists Services. 

We do not amend, correct, update or change any part of your application once it has been submitted. However, if you receive additional confirmations for activities or artists after the closing date you may alert us to these, and we may bring them to the attention of peer assessors at the assessment meeting. These updates could include confirmation that a proposed activity will take place, a partnership has been secured, or funding from another source has been received. 

You can update us about such confirmations by contacting us. Briefly describe the nature of the confirmation and cite your application reference number.  You do not need to send us copies of confirmation emails from third parties – if we need to see evidence of the confirmation we will request it. 

If you wish to update your application once it has been submitted, but the closing date has not yet passed, you can submit a new, updated application and request to withdraw the original one by emailing operationsservicedesk@australiacouncil.gov.au 

Grant applications can be found and are submitted through our online system. If you are using the system for the first time you will need to register your details before filling out a grant application form. 

When will I be notified about the outcome of my application? 

Applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application approximately 12 weeks after the closing date. Please see the guidelines page for the grant category you are interested in for more details. 

Yes, however you must be the applicant. Contact us to discuss your proposal prior to submitting your application.

To apply for this category your project must be circus or physical theatre activity or proposing to support the Victorian circus and physical theatre sector.

This program supports circus and physical theatre practice, it does not extend to dance or dance-theatre. 

Following changes to the circus and physical theatre landscape in Victoria during 2021, the Australia Council for the Arts and Creative Victoria are jointly managing new investments to support the circus and physical theatre sector, guided by the principles of the National Performing Arts Partnership Framework. 

We define a ‘group’ as two or more individuals who do not form a legally constituted organisation.  This can include co-collaborators and collectives.  Groups are not eligible to apply to programs open only to organisations. 

An ‘organisation’ is a legally constituted organisation that is registered or created by law. For example, incorporated associations, companies limited by guarantee or government statutory authorities are all defined as organisations. Organisations that are not legally constituted are not eligible to apply for funding in grant categories that are open to organisations only. Organisations may be required to provide a certificate of incorporation or evidence of their current legal status.  Funding programs for organisations are not intended for sole traders or partnerships. 

No. 

Yes. However, the contact person for group applications must be an Australian citizen or permanent resident. 

We provide funding to practising artists or artsworkers. While you may not regularly earn income from your practice, you must be identified and recognised by your peers as a practising artist or artsworker. This may include cultural practitioners, editors, producers, curators and arts managers. 

No. If you have an overdue grant acquittal you will not be eligible to apply for any further grants. 

No. Only Australian citizens and Australian permanent residents may apply to the Australia Council for funding. Foreign nationals who are permitted to live and work in Australia by holding visas such as a Special Category visa or a Bridging visa are not eligible to apply. 

Yes. Creative research and development is a key component of the creative process and can be funded through this category.

Yes. We accept applications in languages other than English, including Auslan. 

If any part of your application requires translation into English, please contact the Artists Services team at least four weeks before the closing date of the round to which you intend to apply. We will use our best and all reasonable endeavours to assist in having some or all of the material translated. However we reserve the right to refuse an application in a language other than English if we believe there is no genuine reason to accept such an application, or if the time-frame for translation precludes us from making the materials available for assessment in the round to which it was submitted.

If you wish to request an application form in a language other than English, please contact the Artists Services team at least 12 weeks before the closing date of the round to which you intend to apply.

We reserve the right to refuse an application form translation request if we believe there is no genuine reason for the request. We also reserve the right to refuse an application form translation if the time-frame for translation prevents us from providing a translated form in time for assessment in the round to which it was submitted. 

Where you have supplied creative content in a language other than English, we may engage an industry expert to provide the peers with an evaluation of the artistic merit of that creative content. 

You can speak with staff at the Australia Council in your first language. Please telephone the Translating and Interpreting Service on 131 450 (local call anywhere in Australia) and ask to be connected with the Australia Council. 

Applications that focus solely on academic studies, or are for activities that are part of assessable coursework are unlikely to be successful with our assessment panels. Assessment panels are also unlikely to support applications requesting the costs of academic fees or courses. 

If you wish to apply for study costs, explain to the panel how your project extends, or supplements, the course’s standard curriculum requirements. Also, bear in mind that your project will be assessed on artistic merit of the work. 

If you are applying for funding to complete a training program, course, workshop or diploma, explain how doing so will impact positively on your career or practice. 

Do you fund feature film, television or documentary? 

While we can support screen-based art, we do not generally support activities associated with feature film, television or documentary. See Screen Australia, the Federal Government’s primary agency for production of Australian screen activity. https://www.screenaustralia.gov.au/  

No, we do not offer quick response grants. Outside of our regular grants program, we do offer a number of other grants and opportunities. 

Yes. Early career artists are eligible to apply for funding through this category.  

Yes. Individuals and Groups can propose a program of projects and/or activities. This could be a series of projects; or a suite of activities over a fixed period of time.

We encourage applicants to be mindful of the following considerations: 

The activities should each contribute toward a clear, unifying overall objective –  for example,  the development of an individuals or group’s artistic practice. The suite of activity could include creative development or presentation alongside professional development opportunities. It is important to demonstrate the rationale for the inclusion of these activities and how the overall program or suite of activity will align with the individuals or group’s artistic practice and ambition.

In proposing a program consisting of multiple projects or activities, it is possible that some individual projects may be less compelling than others. If you are submitting an application proposing multiple activities or projects, we encourage you to ensure that a similar level of consideration, planning, and artistic merit is common to each to avoid one component of your program potentially letting down the others. 

You may wish to consider using one of the 3 URLs you can provide as support material to link to a document that provides more detail about each individual project or activity in your program. 

As a national arts funding body, all Australia Council grant rounds are competitive. Success rates are usually between 15% and 20%. Success rate for this category may be higher depending on demand.

Yes. Projects must have a start date that falls after we notify you of the outcome of your application, and no later than one year from that date. We will notify you of the outcome of your application approximately 12 weeks after the closing date. 

No. However, applications involving venues and partners are likely to be more competitive if their involvement is confirmed. 

Australia Council staff are available to assist you in understanding the purpose of the grant, application requirements, and submitting your application. Staff can assist over email, phone and using Skype. We cannot review application drafts. 

Additional support can be discussed where needed. Where the additional support required is beyond the scope of what our staff can provide, we may recommend speaking to an appropriate organisation for further assistance. 

The best applications are those where the voice of the artist comes through. Where possible you, ‘the artist’, should write your application. Your manager may administer the grant on your behalf to undertake the financial and reporting requirements. 

If you are applying as an unincorporated entity, unincorporated association or partnership you do not need to have an administrator for your grant. However, you must be able to provide an ABN and bank account that are in the group’s name. If you cannot do this you must nominate an administrator. For more information about this, please contact us. 

All individual or organisation grant applicants based in Australia must have an active Australian Business Number (ABN). Individual applicants without an ABN may have their grant administered by an individual or organisation with an ABN. Organisations operating outside of Australia do not need an ABN to apply. Individuals based outside of Australia may not need an ABN to apply, depending on their circumstances (please check with your accountant or tax advisor). 

Furthermore, the name of the applicant must match the name of the ABN and the name of the bank account into which we pay the funds. There are no exceptions to this rule. If you cannot provide an ABN and bank account that are in the same name as the applicant, you will need to nominate an administrator for your grant. 

For more information about this, please contact us.

Grants can be considered income by Centrelink. The amount is generally assessed as a lump sum and could affect your Centrelink payment for the financial year. Artists who are running a business (even on a small scale) may have their grant treated differently. It is possible to have your grant paid to an administering body if you wish. 

Applicants should contact Centrelink on 13 28 50 for advice. Additionally, Centrelink’s Financial Information Service (FIS) is an education and information service available to everyone in the community and may be of benefit to applicants who also receive assistance through the social security system. To contact FIS phone 13 23 00. 

Yes.  The Australia Council expects that artists professionally employed or engaged on Australia Council-funded activities will be remunerated for their work in line with industry standards. Payment of artist fees should be reflected in your application budget. 

For more information, see our Payment of Artists page. 

Our grants program is primarily designed to support projects that have a defined start and end date, rather than ongoing organisational administration costs. Project budgets that include a high proportion of administration costs may be less competitive. However, if you do need funding to cover administration costs directly related to the delivery of your project, you can include them in your grant request. 

Grants paid by the Australia Council may be considered part of your income in a financial year and may be subject to tax. You must determine your own taxation liabilities. We suggest you consult your financial adviser or contact the Australian Taxation Office on 13 28 66. 

No. The Australia Council encourages applicants whose projects will take place in regional and remote locations to budget accurately and realistically, as it is recognised that costs may differ between regions and major cities. 

If you are GST-registered when you receive an Australia Council grant, the Australia Council will pay the grant amount plus GST. The budget provided in your application should be exclusive of GST. 

Yes. The Australia Council recognises that funding may be required for access costs incurred by applicants with disability, or for costs associated with working with artists with disability – who may have particular access needs (e.g. use of an interpreter, translation services, specific technical equipment, support worker/carer assistance). Access costs are viewed as legitimate expenses and may be included in an applicant’s budget. The Australia Council encourages applicants to ensure that their work is accessible to everyone. Therefore, budgets may also include costs associated with making activities accessible to a wide range of people (e.g. performances using Auslan, captioning, audio description, temporary building adjustments, materials in other formats such as Braille or CD). 

The application form calculates your grant request as the difference between your total cash income, and your total cash costs. The gap between these two numbers is the grant request. In-kind contributions are not included in this calculation. 

Total cash costs – total cash income = grant request 

For example – 

$50,000 cash costs – $30,000 cash income = $20,000 Australia Council grant request. 

Yes. The Australia Council recognises that childcare needs may impede access to employment in the arts. Accordingly, childcare is a legitimate expense to include in an applicant’s budget. 

We encourage our applicants to seek funding from other sources to cover the complete costs of their projects. While it does depend on the size of your grant request to us, we would expect that applicants with large grant requests would also secure funding from elsewhere to cover all costs associated with a large-scale project. 

Yes. Out-of-pocket expenses such as telephone calls or petrol for travel, are recognised as legitimate expenses and may be included in an applicant’s budget. 

Yes. In-kind support refers to resources, goods and services (for example, use of a venue, materials, and/or people’s time) provided by yourself or others either free of charge, or below market value. Detailing in-kind costs in the budget is important as it gives peers a full understanding of the viability of your project and levels of support you are receiving. In-kind costs are also an expense so, when you save your application, any in-kind income you included will auto-populate to the expenses side of the budget. 

Digital Skills Program × Melbourne International Games Week

5-7 October 2022

About this opportunity

The Australia Council is pleased to announce the Digital Skills Program × Melbourne International Games Week.

The Digital Skills Program is a series of workshops, seminars and intensives that focus on using digital and emerging technologies to develop creative practice.

As part of this program we’re offering 6 artists and digital practitioners the chance to experience a selection of the Melbourne International Games week program over three days. The program includes flights to Melbourne, 2 nights accommodation, a per diem and tickets to industry events.

This opportunity is designed for artists and creative practitioners who are already creating work in the digital space or related fields and would like to expand their knowledge of the gaming sector and technologies.

Read more about Melbourne International Games Week here.

This opportunity is designed for artists and creative practitioners who are already creating work in the digital space including but not limited to animators, story board artists, illustrators, composers and sound designers.

Applications will be reviewed by staff and industry advisors. Your application will be based on merit, response to the selection criteria below, and in line with Australia Council’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.

You will need to answer the following questions:

  • Tell us about your creative practice and how you work with digital technologies?
  • Why is this opportunity right for you at this time?
  • Are you available on the 5-7 of October?

Click on the ‘Apply now’ button, or on this link.

Please indicate on the application form if you have any accessibility requirements.

Additional information

Once you submit your application, we will send you an email acknowledging receipt of your application.

After you submit your application, we first check it meets the eligibility criteria for the grant or opportunity to which you are applying.

Applications to the Australia Council Grant Programs are assessed by arts practice peer panels against the published assessment criteria for the relevant grant program.

We aim to notify you of the outcome of your application no later than 12 weeks after the published closing date for the applicable grant round.

Once all applications have been assessed, you will be contacted about the outcome of your application. If you have been successful, you will also be sent a funding agreement. This outlines the conditions of funding, how you will be paid and your grant reporting requirements. The following accordion items outline these stages in more detail.

If your application is successful, you will receive an email advising you a grant is offered. You must then agree to the conditions of your grant, which represents the Australia Council’s contract with you – this can be done online, by email or by letter. Payment of a grant will not be made until the grant conditions have been agreed and accepted by all the relevant parties.

You should not start a project that depends on a grant until all relevant parties have agreed and accepted the grant conditions and we have evidence of such acceptance on file.

Standard grant conditions require you to, among other things:

  • seek prior approval for making a change to a funded project (for example, changes in the activity budget; changes to key creative personnel; or changes to start or end dates)
  • respond to requests for information about the project or grant
  • satisfactorily account for how the grant is spent (if you do not you will be required to return all monies for which you cannot satisfactorily account)
  • comply with all applicable laws
  • acknowledge the Australia Council’s support in all promotional material associated with the project; this includes use of the Australia Council’s logo and a standard text of acknowledgement.
  • provide artistic and financial acquittal reports at the end of the project
  • return any unspent grant funds at the completion of your project or on notice from us to return such unspent funds.

Grant agreements must be signed by a legal entity – either a legally constituted organisation or an individual. For unincorporated groups, see the section on administered grants

All individual or organisation grant applicants based in Australia must have an ABN. Individual applicants without an ABN may have their grant administered by an individual or organisation with an ABN. Organisations operating outside of Australia do not need an ABN to apply. Individuals based outside of Australia may not need an ABN to apply, depending on their circumstances (please check with your accountant or tax advisor).

The name of the applicant must match the name of the ABN and the name of the bank account into which we pay the funds. There are no exceptions to this rule. If applicants cannot provide an ABN and bank account that are in the same name as the applicant’s name, they will need to nominate an administrator for their grant.

Groups/ensembles/collectives, unincorporated associations/ unincorporated entities and other bodies with no legal status do not need an administrator if they have an active Australian Business Number (ABN) and bank account in their name. If they are unable to provide an active ABN and bank account that matches the name of the applicant, they must nominate an administrator. The name of the administrator must match the name of the ABN and bank account into which funds are paid if the application is successful.

If we approve your application you will need accept the conditions of the grant in a funding agreement.

After you accept your funding agreement online, we will automatically generate a payment for the grant on your behalf. You do not need to send us an invoice.

We will pay grant funds directly into your nominated bank account within two weeks after acceptance of the funding agreement. Grant payments cannot be postponed.

If you do not wish to have the grant funds paid directly into your bank account you can choose to have your grant administered by another individual or legally constituted organisation (Doesn’t apply to Arts Projects – Organisations).

When you apply, you will be asked to provide an active Australian Business Number or ‘ABN’. The ABN that you provide must correspond to the name of the applicant (or the administering body, if one has been nominated). When you accept your funding agreement, you will be asked to enter the details of the bank account you wish the grant to be paid into. The name associated with that bank account must correspond to the name in which the ABN has been registered.

Download the Australia Council for the Arts logo guidelines here.

Download the Major Festivals Initiative logo guidelines here.

Grant reports are required on completion of your project. Acquitting a grant means accurately reporting on the funded activities and the expenditure of Australia Council funding.

Please read your funding agreement to check details of the grant acquittal material you should provide.

The grant acquittal report is where you tell us:

  • how you spent your grant
  • what the artistic outcomes of your funded activity were.

If you do not provide a satisfactory grant report at the times and in the manner detailed in your funding agreement, the Australia Council will not make any further payments that may be due to you, and you will not be eligible  to apply for further grants.

If you do not provide a satisfactory grant report, the Australia Council may ask you to pay back all or part of the funding provided to you.

Grant reports are used by the Australia Council to fulfil obligations of accountability to the Australian Government. They are also essential to the development work of the Australia Council. The reports help us evaluate the achievements of funded activities, monitor the effectiveness of grant categories and ensure our policy development is consistent with the experience of artists in the field.

Reporting for Multi-year Funded Organisations

Organisations in receipt of multi-year funding are required to submit financial, statistical, and artistic reporting on an annual basis.

All reporting is submitted online via the Australia Council’s arts organisations reporting system.

If you are not sure what reporting you need to submit as part of your annual reporting, or what information to provide, please get in touch with your Australia Council contact.

All recipients must acknowledge that the Australia Council provided funding for their activities. When you acquit your grant, we will ask you how you acknowledged the Australia Council.

For printed or online material use our logo and this phrase:

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body OR The (company name) is assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

Logos for download and guidelines for the use of our logos.

Where projects do not have a public outcome, or do not produce any printed or online material, you will need to think about how best to acknowledge the Australia Council funding.

Frequently asked questions

You will receive your grant payment within two weeks of accepting your funding agreement. Please note we pay our grants in the financial year which they are approved. We will not adjust payment timelines to the particular circumstances of individuals. 

The deadline for applications is at 3:00pm AET on the closing date. We strongly recommend submitting before this. Administrative and technical support is only available during office hours (Monday-Friday) 9am to 5 pm AET. Late applications will not be accepted. 

Yes, if you have support materials such as letters from project partners, collaborators or participants that are in languages other than English (including Auslan), we can arrange translation or captioning. 

Please contact the Artists Services team at least four weeks before the closing date of the grant round to which you are intending to make an application. If you do not contact us at least four weeks before the closing date, we may not have sufficient time to meet your translation needs. 

Our online application form also has a checkbox at the top which you can tick if you have attached materials in a language other than English. This alerts the Artists Services team that you have submitted these materials. 

We do not accept applications submitted via post. Any material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your application online, please contact Artists Services. 

We do not amend, correct, update or change any part of your application once it has been submitted. However, if you receive additional confirmations for activities or artists after the closing date you may alert us to these, and we may bring them to the attention of peer assessors at the assessment meeting. These updates could include confirmation that a proposed activity will take place, a partnership has been secured, or funding from another source has been received. 

You can update us about such confirmations by contacting us. Briefly describe the nature of the confirmation and cite your application reference number.  You do not need to send us copies of confirmation emails from third parties – if we need to see evidence of the confirmation we will request it. 

If you wish to update your application once it has been submitted, but the closing date has not yet passed, you can submit a new, updated application and request to withdraw the original one by emailing operationsservicedesk@australiacouncil.gov.au 

Grant applications can be found and are submitted through our online system. If you are using the system for the first time you will need to register your details before filling out a grant application form. 

When will I be notified about the outcome of my application? 

Applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application approximately 12 weeks after the closing date. Please see the guidelines page for the grant category you are interested in for more details. 

Yes, however you must be the applicant. Contact us to discuss your proposal prior to submitting your application.

To apply for this category your project must be circus or physical theatre activity or proposing to support the Victorian circus and physical theatre sector.

This program supports circus and physical theatre practice, it does not extend to dance or dance-theatre. 

Following changes to the circus and physical theatre landscape in Victoria during 2021, the Australia Council for the Arts and Creative Victoria are jointly managing new investments to support the circus and physical theatre sector, guided by the principles of the National Performing Arts Partnership Framework. 

We define a ‘group’ as two or more individuals who do not form a legally constituted organisation.  This can include co-collaborators and collectives.  Groups are not eligible to apply to programs open only to organisations. 

An ‘organisation’ is a legally constituted organisation that is registered or created by law. For example, incorporated associations, companies limited by guarantee or government statutory authorities are all defined as organisations. Organisations that are not legally constituted are not eligible to apply for funding in grant categories that are open to organisations only. Organisations may be required to provide a certificate of incorporation or evidence of their current legal status.  Funding programs for organisations are not intended for sole traders or partnerships. 

No. 

Yes. However, the contact person for group applications must be an Australian citizen or permanent resident. 

We provide funding to practising artists or artsworkers. While you may not regularly earn income from your practice, you must be identified and recognised by your peers as a practising artist or artsworker. This may include cultural practitioners, editors, producers, curators and arts managers. 

No. If you have an overdue grant acquittal you will not be eligible to apply for any further grants. 

No. Only Australian citizens and Australian permanent residents may apply to the Australia Council for funding. Foreign nationals who are permitted to live and work in Australia by holding visas such as a Special Category visa or a Bridging visa are not eligible to apply. 

Yes. Creative research and development is a key component of the creative process and can be funded through this category.

Yes. We accept applications in languages other than English, including Auslan. 

If any part of your application requires translation into English, please contact the Artists Services team at least four weeks before the closing date of the round to which you intend to apply. We will use our best and all reasonable endeavours to assist in having some or all of the material translated. However we reserve the right to refuse an application in a language other than English if we believe there is no genuine reason to accept such an application, or if the time-frame for translation precludes us from making the materials available for assessment in the round to which it was submitted.

If you wish to request an application form in a language other than English, please contact the Artists Services team at least 12 weeks before the closing date of the round to which you intend to apply.

We reserve the right to refuse an application form translation request if we believe there is no genuine reason for the request. We also reserve the right to refuse an application form translation if the time-frame for translation prevents us from providing a translated form in time for assessment in the round to which it was submitted. 

Where you have supplied creative content in a language other than English, we may engage an industry expert to provide the peers with an evaluation of the artistic merit of that creative content. 

You can speak with staff at the Australia Council in your first language. Please telephone the Translating and Interpreting Service on 131 450 (local call anywhere in Australia) and ask to be connected with the Australia Council. 

Applications that focus solely on academic studies, or are for activities that are part of assessable coursework are unlikely to be successful with our assessment panels. Assessment panels are also unlikely to support applications requesting the costs of academic fees or courses. 

If you wish to apply for study costs, explain to the panel how your project extends, or supplements, the course’s standard curriculum requirements. Also, bear in mind that your project will be assessed on artistic merit of the work. 

If you are applying for funding to complete a training program, course, workshop or diploma, explain how doing so will impact positively on your career or practice. 

Do you fund feature film, television or documentary? 

While we can support screen-based art, we do not generally support activities associated with feature film, television or documentary. See Screen Australia, the Federal Government’s primary agency for production of Australian screen activity. https://www.screenaustralia.gov.au/  

No, we do not offer quick response grants. Outside of our regular grants program, we do offer a number of other grants and opportunities. 

Yes. Early career artists are eligible to apply for funding through this category.  

Yes. Individuals and Groups can propose a program of projects and/or activities. This could be a series of projects; or a suite of activities over a fixed period of time.

We encourage applicants to be mindful of the following considerations: 

The activities should each contribute toward a clear, unifying overall objective –  for example,  the development of an individuals or group’s artistic practice. The suite of activity could include creative development or presentation alongside professional development opportunities. It is important to demonstrate the rationale for the inclusion of these activities and how the overall program or suite of activity will align with the individuals or group’s artistic practice and ambition.

In proposing a program consisting of multiple projects or activities, it is possible that some individual projects may be less compelling than others. If you are submitting an application proposing multiple activities or projects, we encourage you to ensure that a similar level of consideration, planning, and artistic merit is common to each to avoid one component of your program potentially letting down the others. 

You may wish to consider using one of the 3 URLs you can provide as support material to link to a document that provides more detail about each individual project or activity in your program. 

As a national arts funding body, all Australia Council grant rounds are competitive. Success rates are usually between 15% and 20%. Success rate for this category may be higher depending on demand.

Yes. Projects must have a start date that falls after we notify you of the outcome of your application, and no later than one year from that date. We will notify you of the outcome of your application approximately 12 weeks after the closing date. 

No. However, applications involving venues and partners are likely to be more competitive if their involvement is confirmed. 

Australia Council staff are available to assist you in understanding the purpose of the grant, application requirements, and submitting your application. Staff can assist over email, phone and using Skype. We cannot review application drafts. 

Additional support can be discussed where needed. Where the additional support required is beyond the scope of what our staff can provide, we may recommend speaking to an appropriate organisation for further assistance. 

The best applications are those where the voice of the artist comes through. Where possible you, ‘the artist’, should write your application. Your manager may administer the grant on your behalf to undertake the financial and reporting requirements. 

If you are applying as an unincorporated entity, unincorporated association or partnership you do not need to have an administrator for your grant. However, you must be able to provide an ABN and bank account that are in the group’s name. If you cannot do this you must nominate an administrator. For more information about this, please contact us. 

All individual or organisation grant applicants based in Australia must have an active Australian Business Number (ABN). Individual applicants without an ABN may have their grant administered by an individual or organisation with an ABN. Organisations operating outside of Australia do not need an ABN to apply. Individuals based outside of Australia may not need an ABN to apply, depending on their circumstances (please check with your accountant or tax advisor). 

Furthermore, the name of the applicant must match the name of the ABN and the name of the bank account into which we pay the funds. There are no exceptions to this rule. If you cannot provide an ABN and bank account that are in the same name as the applicant, you will need to nominate an administrator for your grant. 

For more information about this, please contact us.

Grants can be considered income by Centrelink. The amount is generally assessed as a lump sum and could affect your Centrelink payment for the financial year. Artists who are running a business (even on a small scale) may have their grant treated differently. It is possible to have your grant paid to an administering body if you wish. 

Applicants should contact Centrelink on 13 28 50 for advice. Additionally, Centrelink’s Financial Information Service (FIS) is an education and information service available to everyone in the community and may be of benefit to applicants who also receive assistance through the social security system. To contact FIS phone 13 23 00. 

Yes.  The Australia Council expects that artists professionally employed or engaged on Australia Council-funded activities will be remunerated for their work in line with industry standards. Payment of artist fees should be reflected in your application budget. 

For more information, see our Payment of Artists page. 

Our grants program is primarily designed to support projects that have a defined start and end date, rather than ongoing organisational administration costs. Project budgets that include a high proportion of administration costs may be less competitive. However, if you do need funding to cover administration costs directly related to the delivery of your project, you can include them in your grant request. 

Grants paid by the Australia Council may be considered part of your income in a financial year and may be subject to tax. You must determine your own taxation liabilities. We suggest you consult your financial adviser or contact the Australian Taxation Office on 13 28 66. 

No. The Australia Council encourages applicants whose projects will take place in regional and remote locations to budget accurately and realistically, as it is recognised that costs may differ between regions and major cities. 

If you are GST-registered when you receive an Australia Council grant, the Australia Council will pay the grant amount plus GST. The budget provided in your application should be exclusive of GST. 

Yes. The Australia Council recognises that funding may be required for access costs incurred by applicants with disability, or for costs associated with working with artists with disability – who may have particular access needs (e.g. use of an interpreter, translation services, specific technical equipment, support worker/carer assistance). Access costs are viewed as legitimate expenses and may be included in an applicant’s budget. The Australia Council encourages applicants to ensure that their work is accessible to everyone. Therefore, budgets may also include costs associated with making activities accessible to a wide range of people (e.g. performances using Auslan, captioning, audio description, temporary building adjustments, materials in other formats such as Braille or CD). 

The application form calculates your grant request as the difference between your total cash income, and your total cash costs. The gap between these two numbers is the grant request. In-kind contributions are not included in this calculation. 

Total cash costs – total cash income = grant request 

For example – 

$50,000 cash costs – $30,000 cash income = $20,000 Australia Council grant request. 

Yes. The Australia Council recognises that childcare needs may impede access to employment in the arts. Accordingly, childcare is a legitimate expense to include in an applicant’s budget. 

We encourage our applicants to seek funding from other sources to cover the complete costs of their projects. While it does depend on the size of your grant request to us, we would expect that applicants with large grant requests would also secure funding from elsewhere to cover all costs associated with a large-scale project. 

Yes. Out-of-pocket expenses such as telephone calls or petrol for travel, are recognised as legitimate expenses and may be included in an applicant’s budget. 

Yes. In-kind support refers to resources, goods and services (for example, use of a venue, materials, and/or people’s time) provided by yourself or others either free of charge, or below market value. Detailing in-kind costs in the budget is important as it gives peers a full understanding of the viability of your project and levels of support you are receiving. In-kind costs are also an expense so, when you save your application, any in-kind income you included will auto-populate to the expenses side of the budget. 

Acme London Residency

Develop your visual arts practice and professional networks while living and working at Acme’s east London residency space, the Fire Station

Acme Fire Station, 30 Gillender Street, 1999 © Acme Archive

About this opportunity

Through Acme’s partnership with the Australia Council, visual arts professionals (including artists, curators, and arts writers) are offered a six-month residency at Acme’s east London Fire Station residency space.

Founded in 1972, Acme Studios is a London-based charity that provides affordable studio space and residencies and awards for non-commercial fine artists. Acme supports over 800 individual artists across 8 boroughs in Greater London, offering a wide range of high-quality, long-term, and professionally managed artist studio spaces, including permanent new-build studios.

In addition to affordable studio space, Acme operates a Residency & Awards programme which is one of the most supportive and extensive in the UK. Acme’s programme of artist support aims to intervene at pivotal moments in artists’ careers. Working with a range of international and UK-based partners and donors, the programme supports professional development for artists at all stages of their careers through residencies, bursaries, mentoring and exhibition opportunities. Over 700 artists have benefitted from the programme since its foundation in 1987.

Acme makes every effort to assist visiting artists with the practical, cultural, and social aspects of their stay. In addition to managing the studio live/workspace, Acme works actively with visiting artists to assist with their networking, practical and research needs and allowing them to develop relationships and focus on their work in a supported environment. Acme staff are available to artists for residency pre-planning, local orientation and for assistance and advice throughout the residency.

The overall aim of Acme’s Residencies & Awards Programme is to offer artists a supported environment and real professional development throughout the residency period. As every artist and their needs are different, Acme representatives are flexible about how they work with artists to achieve their goals.

During the residency period, Acme provide resident artists with opportunities including:

  • connecting with UK and international artists through Acme’s networks via Acme-organised events including networking drinks, gallery visits and artist dinners
  • bespoke one-to-one studio critiques or mentor meetings with UK-based arts professionals, organised by Acme
  • opportunity to work in collaboration with Acme staff to hold artist talks, or develop or participate in group discussions, critiques or events in the new Acme Pavilion Space
  • one-to-one ongoing support and discussion with Acme staff
  • ongoing notifications and invitations to private views, lectures and events in London.

Meet this year’s participant

Nikki Lam – VIC

Nikki Lam – VIC

Nikki Lam is an artist, curator and producer based in Naarm. Working primarily with moving images, her practice explores hybridity and memory through the contemplation on time, space and impermanence. Born in Hong Kong, her work deals with the complexity of migratory expressions. Nikki’s current research focuses on the artistic agency during cultural, social and political transitions, particularly within the context of moving image and screen cultures. With an expanded practice in writing, exhibition and festival making, she is interested in exploring anti-colonial methods in artistic and curatorial practice.

Nikki is the co-director of Hyphenated Projects and Hyphenated Biennial, and curator-at-large at The Substation. She was Artistic Director of Channels video art festival, alongside many hybrid roles in the arts including at ACMI, Next Wave and Footscray Community Arts Centre. Nikki is a current PhD (Art) candidate at RMIT University.

Who can apply

  • only individuals may apply to this category
  • you must be a practicing artist and an Australian citizen or an Australian permanent resident.

Who can’t apply? 

You can’t apply if:

  • you received a grant, or administered a grant, from the Australia Council in the past and that grant has not been satisfactorily acquitted
  • you owe money to the Australia Council
  • we will not accept applications from legally constituted organisations.

Applicants must address the following assessment criteria:

  1. Artistic merit
  • suitability of your practice to the residency program and its artistic environment/offer
  • quality of work previously produced, and public and peer response to your work.
  1. Viability
  • suitability of your proposal to the residency program
  • the skills and artistic ability of your collaborators and their relevance to the proposed activity
  • realistic and achievable planning, resource use and evaluation.
  1. Impact on career
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your artistic practice
  • the relevance and timeliness of the proposed activity
  • how the proposed activity strengthens your capacity as an arts professional, particularly in relation to international development and collaboration.

Australia Council staff and industry advisors in consultation with Acme will consider applications according to the assessment criteria.

Successful applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by 29 July 2022.

You should submit support material with your application. Assessors may review this support material to help them gain a better sense of your project.

What you should provide 

We do not accept application-related support material submitted via post. Application-related material received by post will not be assessed and will be returned to the sender. If you think you will have difficulty submitting your support material online, or need advice on what type of material to submit, please contact Ellen Dwyer, International Engagement Adviser, Europe on +61 02 9215 9051 or e.dwyer@australiacouncil.gov.au

There are three types of support material you may submit:

  1. Artistic support material

This should include relevant, recent examples of your artistic or cultural work.

Types of support material we accept

Our preferred method of receiving support material is via URLs (weblinks).

You can provide up to three URLs (weblinks) that link to content that is relevant to your proposal. This may include video, audio, images, or written material.

These URLs can include a total of:

  • 10 minutes of video and/or audio recording
  • 10 images
  • 10 pages of written material (for example, excerpts of literary writing).

Please note: Our assessors will not access any URLs that require them to log in or sign up to a platform. Please do not provide links to Spotify or other applications that require users to log in or pay for access.

If you are linking to media files that are private or password protected like Vimeo, please provide the password in the password field on the application form.

Other accepted file formats

If you cannot supply support material via URLs, you may upload support material to your application in the following formats:

  • video (MP4, QuickTime, and Windows Media)
  • audio (MP3 and Windows Media)
  • images (JPEG and PowerPoint)
  • written material (Word and PDF).
  1. Biographies and CVs

You can include a brief bio or curriculum vitae (CV) for key artists, personnel or other collaborators involved in your project.

Brief bios or CV information should be presented as a single document no longer than two A4 pages in total.

  1. Letters of support

Individuals, groups, or organisations can write letters in support of your project. A support letter should explain how the project or activity will benefit you, other artists or arts professionals, participants, or the broader community. It can also detail the support or involvement of key project partners, or evidence of consultation.

If relevant to your activity, letters of support must provide evidence of appropriate permissions and support from First Nations organisations, communities, and Elders. Please refer to the First Nations Protocols for more information.

You can include up to five letters of support, with each letter not exceeding one A4 page.

This residency is housed in a former LCC Fire Brigade Station that was built in 1910 in east London.

Acme’s east London studio complex features 12 work/live units on the upper four floors of the building, with six large non-residential studio spaces on the ground floor.

Each residency unit is 50 sqm large, with the studio element measuring 32 sqm, and features a separate bedroom, private bathroom, and basic kitchen area. The units are electrically heated, and all the windows have secondary glazing to reduce traffic noise and prevent heat loss.

The studio is simply furnished and has a telephone, answering machine, printer, and broadband internet connection. Artists are responsible for providing their own art materials and computer.

Acme are committed to access and diversity in all areas of operation, including service delivery, communication and publicity, staffing, and governance. Access needs for living quarters during a residency can be accommodated on request.

The unit will accommodate couples and Acme can arrange additional bedding for additional guests. However, Fire Station work/live units are not family friendly.

2022-23

2020-2021

  • Hoda Afshar
  • Nathan Beard

2019-2020

  • Channon Goodwin
  • James Geurts

2018-2019

  • Salote Tawale
  • Arlene De Souza

2017-2018

  • Diana Smith
  • Claire Lambe.

Frequently asked questions

Are the residency dates flexible? No. The dates for this residency are fixed.

Yes, but this will be at your own cost and the Australia Council will not be able to provide additional funds towards the extension.

No. You are not required to provide a budget with your application.

There is no requirement for you to provide a timetable of your activities, unless stated otherwise in the individual residency program guidelines.

Yes. If successful, you are required to take out travel insurance for the duration of your residency. It is recommended you pay for this from your grant.

The unit will accommodate couples and Acme can arrange additional bedding for additional guests. However, Fire Station work/live units are not family friendly.

Yes, the grant to an individual that accompanies a residency is considered income and taxable. Please visit the Australian Taxation Office website for more information.

The International Residencies Program is dynamic and responsive and the programs on offer may vary from year to year.

Yes. If you are looking for some tips on organising your residency or programs in the region you’re interested in, check out the Tips and Links resources on our International Engagement web page.

Yes. Please note, applications to International Engagement funding opportunities do not count as an application to the Australia Council Grants Program.

Yes, as long as you have satisfactorily acquitted the previous residency grant.

The grant is not intended to cover lost income or rent at home and applicants will need to consider their capacity to undertake the residency prior to applying.

The Australia Council partners with established and reputable residency providers and each program is unique. Successful applicants will be provided with detailed information about each residency and introductions to the residency providers who will assist artists with making local connections. Australia Council staff are able to provide further advice and contacts, as requested. Artists are also expected to have their own resources, contacts and project plans for the residency.

The grant is a contribution from the Australia Council toward your travel (including airfares and travel insurance) and living costs during the residency period. Applicants are expected to research the cost of living in the residency location they are travelling to. You may need to supplement the grant with your own funds depending on your projected costs for the residency period.

No. The Australia Council cannot provide any advice on visa or immigration matters. You must contact the relevant country’s visa service to get current information. We suggest you allow plenty of time to apply for all international visas.

Access needs for living quarters during a residency can be accommodated on request.

Biennale Delegates Program Participants

The program will facilitate exchange of ideas, catalyse new perspectives and support the seeding of future projects and collaborations.

About the program

A diverse group of 19 emerging creative and cultural workers from across Australia have been announced as participants of the Australia Council Biennale Delegates Program.

The program’s theme is ‘re(situate)’ and will focus on unpacking different biennale engagement approaches within an Australian and regional context. The participants will connect with artists and teams presenting the 59th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, Hawaiʻi Triennial, Documenta 15 and The Biennale of Sydney.

Participants will be guided through the program by Clothilde Bullen, Angie Abdilla, Léuli Eshrāghi, Khaled Sabsabi and Neha Kale. Through online gatherings and an in-person (NSW) residency to facilitate exchange of ideas, catalyse new perspectives and support the seeding of future projects and collaborations.

The 2022 Biennale Delegates Program is generously supported by state and territory partners including ArtsACT, Create NSW, Arts NT, Arts Queensland, Arts South Australia, Arts Tasmania and Creative Victoria and the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries – Western Australia as well as the Cross Family Foundations.

2022 Delegates:

  • Yvette Dal Pozzo (ACT) 
  • Chrischona Schmidt (NT) 
  • Rebekah Raymond (NT) 
  • Aleshia Lonsdale (NSW) 
  • Eddie Abd (NSW) 
  • Jazz Money (NSW) 
  • Riana Head-Toussaint (NSW)
  • Mandy Quadrio (QLD) 
  • Ruha Fifita (QLD)
  • Erin Davidson (SA) 
  • Rayleen Forester (SA) 
  • Sarra Tzijan (SA)
  • Theia Connell (TAS) 
  • Claire G. Coleman (VIC)  
  • Nikki Lam (VIC)
  • Sebastian Henry-Jones (VIC) 
  • Esther McDowell/Yabini Kickett (WA) 
  • Gok-Lim Finch (WA) 
  • Rachel Ciesla (WA)

 

Note: click on images below to learn more about the delegates.

2022 Delegates

Yvette Dal Pozzo – ACT

Yvette Dal Pozzo – ACT

Yvette Dal Pozzo is the Director of the Goulburn Regional Art Gallery. Prior to this role, Yvette was at the National Gallery of Australia, where she worked on major projects, including the two-part exhibition ‘Know My Name: Australian Women Artists 1900 to Now’ and was the editorial assistant and contributor of the corresponding publication titled ‘Know My Name’ (2020). She was also the coordinating editor of Roger Butler’s publication ‘Printed: images by Australian artists 1942-2020’ (2021).

In 2019, Yvette was selected as an Exhibition Attendant to facilitate the Australia Pavilion as part of the 58th Venice Biennale. She has held appointments in galleries, arts festivals, and universities. Yvette holds a Master of Art History and Curatorial Studies from the Australian National University and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree from the University of Melbourne.

Chrischona Schmidt – NT

Chrischona Schmidt – NT

Chrischona is an arts professional and researcher with a background in art history and social anthropology. She has worked with Central Australian Indigenous communities as a researcher and art centre manager since 2006. In 2018, as Manager at Ikuntji Artists, the business won the Australian Small Business Champion Awards in Indigenous Business. The art centre is now one of the most renowned fine art specialised Indigenous art centres in Australia.
Before that, she worked in research and different areas of the art market, including auction houses, galleries and museums in Australia and overseas.
Chrischona researches local art histories in Central Australia with a particular focus on women’s work. She wrote the first art history of an art movement without an art centre and co-organised the first conference on Indigenous jewellery. She engages actively with the academic discourse through her publications, conference attendance and as a co-organiser of the University of Queensland art history program field school.

Rebekah Raymond – NT

Rebekah Raymond – NT

Rebekah Raymond is a proud Arabana, Mualgal, and Wuthathi woman, with further cultural connections which have been disrupted by the Stolen Generations. She grew up on Larrakia Country and Limilngan-Wulna Country. Rebekah holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Sydney, with majors in Art History and Archaeology.

Rebekah has worked across state and national arts organisations and institutions, while also undertaking independent curatorial, editorial and research projects. Her curatorial practice centres community collaboration, language, archives, and intergenerational knowledge. She currently works as the Curator of Aboriginal Art and Material Culture at the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory (MAGNT), located on Larrakia Country.

Aleshia Lonsdale – NSW

Aleshia Lonsdale – NSW

Aleshia Lonsdale is a Visual Artist, Arts Worker and Curator based in regional New South Wales (NSW). As a proud Wiradjuri woman from Mudgee in Central Western NSW, Lonsdale creates work using various materials, including natural and found objects that endeavour to give voice to First Nations peoples. She sees the arts as a vehicle for intergenerational cultural transmission and as a tool that allows the audience to view the world through a First Nations lens. With a strong grounding in Culture and Country, her works are influenced by the past, present and future experiences of First Nations Peoples with a particular focus on social, cultural, political and environmental issues.

Eddie Abd – NSW

Eddie Abd – NSW

Eddie Abd is an artist and arts worker living and working on unceded Darug and Gundungurra Lands. Eddie creates intricate, multilayered digital and textile works grounded in her lived experience while responding to a range of concerns from the social to the political and religious.

Her video and digital print works often feature self-referential composite characters inhabiting remixed spaces and engaging in heightened acts of identity performance. Eddie was awarded the 2021 Blake Prize (Emerging Artist) and shortlisted for the Create NSW 2021/2022 Visual Arts (Emerging) Fellowship.

Born in Lebanon in 1979, Eddie studied Fine Arts (Painting) at the Lebanese University. After moving to Australia in 2001, she completed a Bachelor of Digital Media at the University of New South Wales (COFA).

Jazz Money – NSW

Jazz Money – NSW

Jazz Money is a poet and artist of Wiradjuri heritage, a fresh-water woman currently based on Gadigal land. Her practice is centred around the written word while producing works that encompass installation, digital, film and print. Jazz’s writing has been widely performed and published nationally and internationally.

Trained as a filmmaker and arts worker, Jazz specialises in storytelling, community collaboration and digital production, working with First Nations artists and communities to realise digital projects.

Jazz’s debut collection of poetry, ‘how to make a basket’, was released in September 2021 with University of Queensland Press.

Riana Head-Toussaint – NSW

Riana Head-Toussaint – NSW

Riana Head-Toussaint is an interdisciplinary disabled artist who uses a manual wheelchair for mobility. Her work often crosses traditional artform boundaries and exists in online and offline spaces. She employs performance, choreography, video/film, sound design, installation and audience activation to create works that interrogate entrenched systems, structures and ways of thinking; and advocate for social change. The enduring concerns across her works are agency, representation, the limits of empathy, and how these impact people across various marginalised intersections. Her work is deeply informed by her experiences as a disabled woman of Afro-Caribbean heritage and her training as a legal practitioner.

Riana’s practice also involves broader curatorial/space-making projects. She is the founder of Headquarters, a disability-led, digital space; centring and celebrating disabled creatives. Riana is also a qualified Solicitor and Access Consultant. She lives and works on the unceded lands of the Eora Nation.

Mandy Quadrio – QLD

Mandy Quadrio – QLD

Mandy Quadrio is an Indigenous Palawa artist connected to her maternal ancestral countries of Tebrakunna, north-east Tasmania and the Oyster Bay Nation of eastern Tasmania. Currently based in Meanjin (Brisbane), she works across sculpture, installation, photography and mixed media. She received a Doctorate in Visual Arts at Queensland College of Art, Griffith University, in 2021.

By reimagining cultural associations of Indigenous and non-Indigenous objects, Quadrio aims to draw attention to historical and contemporary cultural and political events that impact Australian Indigenous people. She works to expose holes and myths in Australian colonial histories

Quadrio has shown in numerous solo, and group shows around Australia, including the TarraWarra Biennial in Melbourne in 2021 and at Ace Open in Adelaide as part of Tarnanthi festival of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art 2021. Her work was permanently acquired by the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery, Launceston, Tasmania, in 2021.

Ruha Fifita – QLD

Ruha Fifita – QLD

Ruha Fifita (Tonga/New Zealand) is an interdisciplinary artis based in Brisbane. She is co-founder of Pacific art research collective, IVI, Griffith Asia Institute Industry Fellow, and Curatorial Assistant for Pacific Art at the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

Her creative practice fosters collaboration, community engagement and connection with indigenous methods and materials to achieve social change. She holds a Bachelor of Creative Industries, and a post-graduate Certificate in Discourse and Social Transformation.

Ruha’s work has exhibited throughout the Pacific region in settings such as, the Mori Art Museum, Festival of Pacific Arts, the Dreaming Festival, Auckland Art Festival, Pataka Art Gallery, the National Gallery of Victoria, the Tjibaou Cultural Centre, UNSW Gallery, and Seoul Museum of Art.

Erin Davidson – SA

Erin Davidson – SA

Erin Davidson holds the position of Project Manager at the Art Gallery of South Australia and is responsible for delivering two of the country’s major biennial programs celebrating contemporary art and artists, the Ramsay Art Prize and the Adelaide Biennial Australian Art. Over the last decade, she has worked with South Australian cultural institutions and organisations in various roles.

In 2021, she commenced lecturing in Business Practice for Artists and Designers at the University of South Australia. Her formal education includes Interior Design, Art History, Criticism and Conservation, and Museum and Curatorial Studies. Her professional experiences range from tutoring in interior design, working in engineering and design studios, and managing exhibitions and projects for arts and cultural organisations.

Rayleen Forester – SA

Rayleen Forester – SA

Rayleen Forester is an Adelaide based, independent curator and arts writer. She holds Graduate Diplomas in Art History (University of Adelaide) and Arts & Cultural Management (University of South Australia) and is a South Australian School of Art graduate.

Rayleen’s curatorial interests focus on cross-cultural engagement through contemporary and experimental art practices. She was awarded the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi Travel Grant (2010) to collaborate with Japanese curator and Gallery Director Katsuya Ishida and the inaugural Curator Mentorship Initiative grant (2012) to work with international curator Cuauhtémoc Medina at the MANIFESTA biennale. She co-curated the Artists’ Week symposium in 2014 with Lars Bang Larsen (DEN) and Richard Grayson (UK). In 2016, she completed a residency at ICI New York curatorial hub program.

Rayleen writes for national publications and is a founding member of initiatives FELTspace and fine print magazine. In 2020 she was inaugural curator in residence at ACE Open, Adelaide, co-curating If the future is to be worth anything: 2020 Artist Survey with Artistic Director, Patrice Sharkey.

Sarra Tzijan – SA

Sarra Tzijan – SA

Sarra Tzijan is an Indian/Australian artist, originally from Naarm, now living in Tarntanya. Tzijan makes functional, sculptural and wearable objects, playing with the intersections of art and craft, highlighting their limitations. She draws on her mixed heritage to unpack themes of belonging, cultural displacement and colonisation. Adopting a multi-disciplinary and collaborative approach, she encourages the influence of others in her work.

During early education, Tzijan focused on drawing and illustration. In 2014 she completed a degree in Communication Design (RMIT), refining her work on paper. In 2016 she completed an Advanced Diploma of Object and Jewellery Design (Melbourne Polytechnic) and began combining her illustrative aesthetic with three-dimensional objects. In 2018 she was selected to undertake an associateship at JamFactory in the metal studio where she’s currently a tenant.

Theia Connell – TAS

Theia Connell – TAS

Theia Connell is an artist, curator and producer living on unceded Muwinina country in nipaluna/Hobart. Her professional practice has seen her working within festivals, museums, galleries and not-for-profit art spaces regularly for a decade. Theia works closely with contemporary artists to build exhibitions, live events and site-specific projects. Her practice is grounded in the value of collaboration and mutual support and in developing meaningful context for experimental art.

Recent roles include Co-founder and Co-director of Visual Bulk art space, member of the Artistic Directorate at Next Wave, Creative Associate at Dark Mofo, Creative Producer at Dark Mofo, and board member at CONSTANCE ARI. She has exhibited as an independent artist across Australia and internationally, including Incheon Art Platform (Seoul), Snehta (Athens), BUS Projects, Watch This Space ARI, Firstdraft, Kings ARI and more. Theia completed a BFA (Visual Art) at VCA in 2014, and a BA (Art History) at University of Melbourne in 2010.

Claire G. Coleman – VIC

Claire G. Coleman – VIC

Claire G. Coleman is a Noongar woman whose ancestral country is on the south coast of Western Australia.  Born in Perth, she has spent most of her life in Naarm (Melbourne).

Her debut novel Terra Nullius, published by Hachette in Australia and Small Beer in the US, won a black&write! Fellowship and a Norma K. Hemming Award and was shortlisted for the Stella Prize and the Aurealis Science Fiction Award, among others. The Old Lie (Hachette 2019) is her second novel.

Her art criticism has been published in Spectrum, Artlink and Art Collector, and in exhibition catalogues for NGV, AGSA, NGA, and others.  Her conceptual/video work, Refugium, won the Incinerator Art Award in 2021.

Lies Damned Lies: A Personal Exploration of the Impact of Colonisation, her first nonfiction book published in September 2021 by Ultimo Press.

Nikki Lam – VIC

Nikki Lam – VIC

Nikki Lam is an artist, curator and producer based in Naarm. Working primarily with moving images, her practice explores hybridity and memory through the contemplation on time, space and impermanence. Born in Hong Kong, her work deals with the complexity of migratory expressions. Nikki’s current research focuses on the artistic agency during cultural, social and political transitions, particularly within the context of moving image and screen cultures. With an expanded practice in writing, exhibition and festival making, she is interested in exploring anti-colonial methods in artistic and curatorial practice.

Nikki is the co-director of Hyphenated Projects and Hyphenated Biennial, and curator-at-large at The Substation. She was Artistic Director of Channels video art festival, alongside many hybrid roles in the arts including at ACMI, Next Wave and Footscray Community Arts Centre. Nikki is a current PhD (Art) candidate at RMIT University.

Sebastian Henry-Jones – VIC

Sebastian Henry-Jones – VIC

Sebastian Henry-Jones is a curator led by an interest in writing, DIY thinking, and the exhibition format’s potential to cultivate strategies of collectivity, social responsibility, and tenderness. He looks to embody these ideals in his work by centring the needs, ideas, and requirements of those he works with. His practice is informed by striving for personal ethics with sincerity, generosity, honest communication, and learning at its core.

Seb has staged group exhibitions and independent projects in Sydney and interstate and co-founded Desire Lines and Emerson. Previously, he was an editor at Runway Journal and has held curatorial roles at The 22nd Biennale of Sydney and West Space.

Esther McDowell/Yabini Kickett – WA

Esther McDowell/Yabini Kickett – WA

Yabini Kickett (Esther McDowell) is a descendant of the Kickett and Hayden families of the Bibulmun/Noongar Nation. Having grown up with an artist and poet mother and a photographer and land conservationist father, her practice is heavily rooted in language, endemic plants, family, totemic relations and found objects from Country.

Yabini has exhibited as an independent artist across Australia, including at Art Gallery of Western Australia (2021), Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts (2020), Cool Change Contemporary (2018) and more.

Gok-Lim Finch – WA

Gok-Lim Finch – WA

Gok-Lim is a writer and artist living on the unceded sovereign lands of the Whadjuk people of the Bibbulmun nation. In 2019, they were a Creative Research Fellow for the State Library of WA. From 2018 to 2020, they were the board secretary of Propel Youth Arts WA, and the Project Coordinator for Community Arts Network’s Lotterywest Story Street project. They are currently studying a PhD at the University of Western Australia on the history of the Christmas Island workers union and working as the Student Engagement Officer for Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery.

Rachel Ciesla – WA

Rachel Ciesla – WA

Rachel Cieśla is the Lead Creative for the Simon Lee Foundation Institute of Contemporary Asian Art at the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Boorloo. She is also a co-founder and co-editor of Heart of Hearts Press.

Digital Fellowship Program

In partnership with Creative New Zealand, this program brings together artists to explore and develop digital practice.

Image: Whakapapa/Algorithms by Jamie Berry of Te Aitanga a Māhaki, Rongowhakaata, Ngati Porou, Ngāpuhi iwi.

This fellowship program brings practitioners based in Australia and New Zealand together to co-develop their digital practice and set directions for the future of the arts in our region.

The six-month program prioritises collaborative learning, as well as individual practice development, through a series of curated online gathering sessions, an in-person residential and mentoring. Investment is also offered to enable participants to realise new ideas and set the course of their future work. The program includes:

  • In-person gathering – three day curated in person gathering including collaboration, learning, engagement, skills exchange and facilitated activities for all participants
  • Online gathering sessions – two curated one-day sessions of learning, skills exchange and facilitated activities for all participants.
  • Mentoring – participants are matched with a digital mentor to develop skills and practice through a 1-1 model.
  • Investment – funding of $10,000 is provided for each participant to collaborate, develop or present their digital practice.

Five Australian participants will join five New Zealand participants, with identified positions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Pasifika applicants.

The program will build the skills, networks and leadership of participants, to support a thriving and creative digital culture in the arts. The program will strengthen the connections between Australia and New Zealand practitioners and organisations.

This program is developed and delivered in partnership with Creative New Zealand.

 


For more information about this opportunity please email Jorjia Gillis at j.gillis@australiacouncil.gov.au or call 02 9215 9040.

Meet the Facilitators

Hainoame Fulivai, New Zealand

Hainoame Fulivai, New Zealand

Hainoame is an experienced, values- driven leadership with over 20 year track record in research, community development, social mobilisation of disadvantaged communities, advocacy and civil rights, entrepreneurship and philanthropy funding. She’s an active techie with game-changing prototypes in Indigenous Pacific women’s wealth systems underway.

Hainoame has worked on a number of projects for New Zealand government agencies, universities in Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia, and independent projects focused on Pacific mobilisation at scale. She is an experienced community development leader and social activator who recently completed a trail blazing term for local government, as a Co-Chair for the Pacific Peoples’ Advisory Panel at Auckland Council and sits on various governing non-government organisations and collective networks in philanthropy, digital equity and climate resilience.

Hainoame holds a Master in Arts (Hons) in Education from the University of Auckland with credentials in Food Compliance (Victoria, Australia) and NCALE.  She will be graduating in March 2023 with her second Masters in Technological Futures for Emerging Disruptive Technology. She is fluent in both Tongan and English, and dedicated to supporting Tangata Whenua kaupapa and upholding tikanga as Tangata (wahine) Te Tiriti.

Lia Pa’apa’a, Australia

Lia Pa’apa’a, Australia

Lia is an artist and mama who has cultural connections to Samoa and the Luiseño nation of Southern California.  Lia’s practice is interdisciplinary and Lia works as an artist, Creative Producer and Community Arts Cultural Development practitioner.  Lia creates culturally safe spaces that allow for immersive experiences that support creativity, wellbeing and the transfer of indigenous knowledge systems.  Lia is currently the Festival Director of the First Nations Children’s Festival that explores intergenerational exchange through Arts, Culture and Ceremony and is the  Co-creator of the NGAMUMU (For Mothers) project that delivers community workshops, festival installations and creative programming for mothers and families during the first 1000 days (conception to age two).

Lia lives on Yidinji lands in Cairns Australia with her two young children and partner and is revitalising and reimagining ancestral practices to support her family’s and community’s health and wellbeing.

Meet the current participants

Vidya Rajan, Australia

Vidya Rajan, Australia

Vidya Rajan is a first-generation tamil migrant living & working between Boorloo and Naarm. A multi-disciplinary artist interested in hybrid forms, she works across writing for stage & screen, contemporary performance, comedy & play-based making & increasingly in the new media & digital space.   
 
A graduate of the VCA, she has variously originated & contributed to projects for Darwin Festival, The Malthouse, Belvoir, Red Stitch, The Wheeler Centre, Liminal Magazine, Artshouse, Running Dog, SBS, ABC, The Blue Room amongst others. A former writer-in-residence at the Malthouse Theatre, she has also been a recipient of Melbourne Festival’s Director’s Lab, Screen Australia’s Developer program, Wheeler Centre’s Hot Desk Fellowship, Film Vic’s Games Writing Initiative, and MAV’s inaugural Diasporas program. As a facilitator and teaching artist, she has recently worked with Footscray Community Arts, Writer’s Victoria, Midsumma, Back to Back Theatre, Context Festival & RMIT participatory art program. Interested in non-hierarchical curatorial practices, she curated and dramaturged Proximities (an interactive digital exhibition for Blak and POC creators) for Darebin Council, co-devised and dramaturged Sangam Festival’s Dada Desi (a new experimental art gathering for emerging South Asian artists in Melbourne), and developed a discursive poetry commissioning series for Djed Press. 
 
In her arts practice, she is interested in work that’s about: the slipperiness of identity as a concept and material reality across irl & url space; systemic structures & the search for community within capitalism; eastern religious thought & speculative fiction futures, digital colonialism & its effects on cultural & historical memory, data ethics & radicalisation. She often uses playfulness, humour and surrealism as a core tool in her practice, and is increasingly investigating how game design can combine with performance art practices to create unique audience experiences and new ways into storytelling.

Tanu Gago, New Zealand

Tanu Gago, New Zealand

Tanu Gago (MNZM) is an interdisciplinary artist, queer activist and filmmaker. In 2019 Gago was inducted into the order of merit, with Queen’s honors for services to Pacific arts and the LGBTQIA+ community. He is a 2020 Arts Foundation Arts Laureate, 2020 CNZ Pacific Arts Contemporary Artist recipient, and the 2022 McCahon House artist in residence.

This year Gago was the guest judge for the prestigious Moon Jury at ImagineNATIVE Film + Digital Arts Festival in Toronto, Canada. Gago is also an artist in development with Piki films (Carthew Neil and Taika Waititi’s production company) and the writer director of ATUA, which premiered at Sundance Film Festival in 2022.

In recent years Gago has been working at the intersections of film, Queer activism, moving image, animation and AR interactivity. A Samoan Immigrant raised in South Auckland, Gago is also the cofounder of Queer Indigenous Arts Collective FAFSWAG.

Sophie Dumaresq, Australia

Sophie Dumaresq, Australia

Sophie Dumaresq is an interdisciplinary artist working in new media robotic arts and photo media in addition to large and small-scale sculptural installations. She also performs stand-up and sketch-based comedic performance art as the cybernetic femme clown bot “Sharkie Dee”, alongside her self-made animatronic shark who answers to the name of Cherie. Her work explores the politics of care through symbiotic cycles of consumption, destruction and creation which demonstrate how as a species we relate, show empathy, learn and evolve with and within our surrounding environment.

She works primarily in Ngunnawal Country as well as Yuin Country, located on Australia’s eastern coast and capital city, Canberra, Australia. In 2021 she received the Peter and Lena Karmel Anniversary Prize in Art for the most outstanding body graduating body of work from the Australian Nation University’s School of Art and Design, as well as the Eckersley’s Materials Emerging Artist Support Scheme Award. In 2022 she was awarded the 2022 Peter and Lena Karmel Visual Honours Scholarship. In 2022 she was a finalist in the 2022 William and Winifred Bowness Photography Prize and The Land and its Psyche – Macquarie Group Emerging Artist Prize. Her work was then acquired by Macquarie Group Collection. In 2022 she also performed live alongside her animatronic and robotic self-made artworks/performance partners during Sydney’s Vivid Festival at Carriage Works through Performance Space’s Live Works program.

Sandy May Wakefield, New Zealand

Sandy May Wakefield, New Zealand

Sandy May Wakefield [Ngāpuhi, Ngāi Tahu] was raised in Te Tai Tokerau and spent her teenage summers stacking firewood and making horror movies down by the creek with her cousins. A burgeoning career in sound recording in film and television follows and informs her pathway into the world of a multimedia contemporary art practice. Freshly graduated with a Master of Arts, Sandy finds opportunities to make work and create in diverse communities. 

Raelke Grimmer, Australia

Raelke Grimmer, Australia

Raelke Grimmer is an autistic writer and linguist living on Larrakia Country in Darwin, Northern Territory. Her creative work has been published in Australian literary journals Griffith Review, Westerly, Kill Your Darlings and Meniscus. She is a founding editor of Northern Territory literary journal Borderlands and is currently experimenting with hybrid forms of storytelling using analogue film photography. Raelke lectures in Creative Writing and Applied Linguistics at Charles Darwin University. 

Pelenakeke Brown, New Zealand

Pelenakeke Brown, New Zealand

Pelenakeke Brown: is an interdisciplinary artist, curator, and writer, Pelenakeke’s practice explores the intersections between disability cultural concepts and Sāmoan cultural concepts. Her work investigates sites of knowledge, and she uses technology, writing, poetry, and performance to explore these ideas.

She has worked with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gibney Dance Center, The New York Library for the Performing Arts and other institutions globally. Selected residencies include Eyebeam, The Laundromat Project, and Dance/NYC. Her work has been featured in Art in America and The New York Times. She was recognised in 2020 with a Creative New Zealand Pacific Toa award. 

Kathryn Gledhill-Tucker, Australia

Kathryn Gledhill-Tucker, Australia

Kat is a Nyungar technologist, writer, digital rights activist living on Whadjuk Noongar boodjar who experiments with digital poetry and speculative fiction. Their work explores the intersection of activism, science-fiction, and technology in imagining radical futures and ushering them into existence.

Joshua Faleatua, New Zealand

Joshua Faleatua, New Zealand

Joshua is an Auckland-based freelance dancer and filmmaker. Since graduating from the University of Auckland, Joshua has gone on to work with multiple dance companies, choreographers and directors as both a dancer and filmmaker.

He has worked with companies such as Footnote New Zealand Dance, Chunky Move, Stephanie Lake Company, The New Zealand Dance Company, Movement Of The Human, Body Island, Ta’alili and Taane Mete (the Company). Through various dance companies, Joshua has developed and performed in live shows that have toured across New Zealand, Australia, Switzerland, Germany and China. Alongside being a performer, Joshua has also worked at University of Melbourne and The University Of Auckland as a dance tutor. As a filmmaker, he has created video content for small businesses such as tattoo studios, clothing brands, barber shops, music and dance companies.

Joshua approaches film with the same exploration techniques and mindset found within the creative process of developing a live dance show. Through this dance-oriented framework, Joshua has pushed the boundaries of film creativity and developed a unique style of shooting and editing that has generated innovative films.

Gabi Briggs, Australia

Gabi Briggs, Australia

Gabi Briggs is an Anaiwan & Gumbaynggirr gedyura (woman) who is a research-based artist working within a diverse range of mediums and community-building projects. Community work has led her art practice into deep contemplation about colonial harm to kin and country, resulting in her eliciting a dialogue about truth-telling and a return to Indigenous Knowledge systems. She intends that the conversation moves outside the gallery (or publication) and into communities to prompt transformative justice. She is currently a PhD candidate in the Monash Wominjeka Djeembana lab at Monash University.

Ahilapalapa Rands, New Zealand

Ahilapalapa Rands, New Zealand

Ahilapalapa Rands was born in Aotearoa and has whakapapa to Hawaii, Samoa, Cook Islands, Fiji, Scotland, Ireland and England. She holds a Bachelor of Visual Arts from Auckland University of Technology and a Diploma in Te Reo Māori from Te Wananga o Raukawa in Ōtaki, Aotearoa. She loves working collaboratively and has co-founded and worked in collectives for over a decade including D.A.N.C.E. art club alongside Vaimaila Urale, Tuafale Tanoa’i aka Linda T, and Chris Fitzgerald; London based In*ter*is*land Collective alongside Lyall Hakaraia, Jo Walsh and Jessica Palalagi and most recently Moana Fresh with Vaimaila Urale. An aspiring decolonial cancerian to her core she works to restore, rediscover and perpetuate ways of being and creating in relationship with one another across our Moana nui a Kiwa. Ahilapalapa’s art practice has a focus on her lived experience as part of the Hawaiian diaspora navigating colonial borders that block access to ancestral homelands. All of this living and making is informed by being tangata tiriti in beautiful Aotearoa and continuing to engage with and understand what that means in practice. 

Artists working across any artform (community engaged practice, dance, digital arts, film and radio, literature, music, multi arts, theatre and visual arts) are eligible to apply.

The program is designed for artists within their first five years of digital practice.

Applications open on Monday 29 August 2022 and close on Tuesday 11 October 2022, 3pm AEDT.

The program runs from January – June 2023, with a combination of one in-person residential, online gathering sessions, 1-1 sessions and self-directed learning and development.

The in-person residential will take place over three days on 2-4 February 2023. All travel will be covered as part of the program.

The online gathering sessions will be delivered online on 6 April 2023 and 25 May 2023.

There is no cost for selected participants to join the program.

It is a condition of the program that participants must be available to attend the in-person residential, both online gathering sessions, and mentoring sessions.

Participants are also required to provide an acquittal of funding on completion of the program.

Applications will be assessed by internal assessors and industry advisors, in both Australia and New Zealand.

Selection criteria:

  • Timeliness and relevance of the program to the applicant’s development.
  • An active and open approach to creative digital practice
  • Ability to engage with diverse ways of learning and connecting with others.
  • Alignment to the strategic priorities identified in the Australia Council Digital Culture Strategy 2021-2024 and Creative New Zealand’s Pacific Arts Strategy 2018-2023.

Applicants may be invited to an online interview following the submission of an application.

Individuals can apply via our online application system. If you have access requirements, please get in touch so we can assist you.

Written response questions

  1. Introduce yourself and why are you interested in participating in this program 

Provide a brief introduction to yourself and your work, and why this program is relevant to you at this time. What has led you to apply for this program? What is your motivation for participating? How can the program support you to advance your practice towards an exciting future?

In this question we want to know how this program connects to your creative practice development.

You can choose to upload a 3-minute video in response to this question or answer in writing.

  1. Tell us about your digital practice. What motivates and interests you?

We use the term ‘digital’ broadly. Digital includes both online platforms and technologies that extend or impact on the creation, presentation and distribution of creative content. Importantly, we refer to digital as a way of doing things and a way of thinking: a digital mindset.

We think of digital as an:

  • Enabler
  • Practice
  • Mindset
  • Platform
  • Industry

For Pacific arts, we think of digital as it relates to:

  • Va – the space in between.  Meaningful spaces between people, places, cultures, time and dimensions, tangible and intangible.  A space that connects rather than separates.
  • Digital Moana – meaningful connections across Aotearoa, Oceania, and globally, to ensure arts are further enriched through new tools and technologies.
  • Moana, Te Moana-nui-a-Kiva, the ocean homeland of Pasifika peoples that is the fluid bridge between Aotearoa New Zealand, other lands and opportunities.

In this question we are interested in understanding your approach to digital practice.

  1. Tell us about a time that you worked collectively with others.

Our programs bring together artists and practitioners from a diversity of artforms, cultural backgrounds and geographical locations. We create safe spaces to encourage open, generous, and collaborative approaches to learning, experimentation and digital creativity.

In this question, share your experience of a relationship or exchange that has been an important moment for you in your creative digital practice.

  • James Albert, Australia
  • Mi-kaisha Masella, Australia
  • April Phillips, Australia
  • Victoria Chiu, Australia
  • Roshelle Fong, Australia
  • Emele Ugavule, Australia
  • Michel Mulipola, New Zealand
  • Sione Faletau, New Zealand
  • George Turner, New Zealand
  • Rosanna Raymond, New Zealand
  • Jamie Berry, New Zealand
  • Katrina Iosia, New Zealand

Frequently asked questions

The fellowship program involves a three day in-person residential, two x one day online gathering sessions, regular 1-1 mentoring sessions and a financial investment in the development, creation and/or presentation of new digital work.

In person residential

The in-person residential will allow the group, facilitators and guest speakers to come together and connect on Country and exchange knowledge and support.

The residential will take place over three days at a location to be announced shortly. This cross-country opportunity enable participants to experience local culture and digital work, engage in workshops with guest speakers, exchange ideas, create community within the group and network with the wider sector.

Online gathering sessions

These online sessions are an opportunity for group learning and knowledge sharing, supported by core facilitators and informed by expert guest speakers and presenters.

These online gatherings will be delivered over two one-day sessions and provide time and space for participants to develop skills, knowledges, and networks around digital practice. The gatherings are a space for peer learning, and curated expert led sessions with industry leaders.

Topics and themes may be covered in the online gatherings include:

  • Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property in the digital space
  • New platforms and technologies for artists and creative organisations
  • Experimentation, collaboration and digital engagement
  • Accessibility in the digital space
  • Decolonisation of digital futures

Mentoring

Each participant will be matched with a mentor, and have six 1-1 sessions throughout the program.  The mentor will provide support and guidance with the development and creation of new work and project proposals in line with the participants’ practice. Participants may be matched with a mentor based in Australia or New Zealand.

Investment

Participants will receive a grant of $10,000 (AUD) to support the development and creation of new work throughout the fellowship program. The funding must be directed towards new work, collaborations and/or presentations developed over the course of the program. Mentors may support the development of this work. Participants will receive the funding on commencement of the program in January 2023.

There will be two lead facilitators for the fellowship program, one based in Australia and one in New Zealand. There will also be a range of guest speakers, case studies and experts who will join throughout the program.

A pool of mentors will be developed in collaboration with Australia Council and Creative NZ, and participants will be matched with a suitable mentor based on their goals and objectives. Participants may be matched with a mentor in either Australia or New Zealand.

Participants must be available for the in-person residential, online gathering sessions and mentoring sessions over the six-month program. These are compulsory activities as part of the Fellowship.

It is encouraged that participants dedicate time and space to the development of new work and ideas throughout the program.

This program will be delivered in-person, online, and involve hybrid programming where possible.

For any questions or further information about the Digital Fellowship please email j.gillis@australiacouncil.gov.au or call 02 9215 9040

New Zealand applicants can also call Catherine George at Creative New Zealand +64 27 807 4221.

International Engagement Fund

The Australia Council’s International Engagement Fund supports a range of activity that fosters people-to people connections; creates opportunities for cultural exchange and knowledge sharing; and showcases Australian creativity, culture and identity internationally.

Applications for this round of the International Engagement Fund can be made by applying to either Arts Projects for Organisations or Arts Projects for Individuals and Groups, closing Tuesday 7 March 2023 at 3pm AEDT.

This round of Arts Projects for Organisations and Arts Projects for Individuals and Groups includes additional funding from the International Engagement Fund which will support competitive applications that meet the priorities of the International Engagement Strategy 2021-2025.

Watch a recording of the online information session

Activity may take place in any part of the world in line with the Australia Council’s new International Engagement Strategy 2021–2025.

The priorities of the new strategy are, to:

  • rethink and expand the concept of mobility through testing dynamic engagement models that include digital, hybrid and in-person connection
  • leverage technologies and digital platforms for creation, distribution, networking, and increasing discoverability of Australian work
  • activate borderless thinking to build reciprocal and multilateral partnerships across regions and industries, and leverage co-investment
  • strengthen First Nations exchange that is First Nations-led and self-determined
  • amplify Asia Pacific engagement, and the perspectives of the Asia Pacific diaspora in Australia
  • diversify income and revenue streams to foster sustainable careers and business models by increasing access to markets, information and networks and showcase Australian work to global audiences and influencers
  • foster risk-taking, experimentation and innovation in creation, distribution, connection and profile-building
  • centre equity and access and reflect Australia’s diversity
  • embed sustainability through research and investment in best-practice models and frameworks to minimise the sector’s carbon footprint.

You can view the full International Engagement Strategy here.

Our vision is for Australian arts, culture and creativity to be thriving and known globally for its innovation, sustainability and diversity.

If you wish to apply for a literary translation and/or publication overseas please apply to the Australia Council’s Translation Fund for Literature.


Case studies

Below are some examples of Australian work presented internationally since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Theses activities required that also intersect with the priorities of the International Engagement Strategy 2021-2025. These are some examples of activities that are likely to be competitive in this fund, in addition to the list of successful applicants from Round 1 and Round 2. 

  • Andrew Undi Lee: Night Bloomers – the webtoon series is an online and intercontinental collaboration between Korean Australian and native Korean webtoon artists, working together to produce a 6-part anthology webtoon series that reflect various Korean Diaspora narratives from Australia. February 2022 to February 2023.
  • Miku Performing Arts: Gapu Nguban (Chasing the Rainbow) is a powerful, celebratory new work of song, music and dance being created by First Nations artists – Yolgnu artists from Arnhem Land, NT, and Paiwan tribe from Taiwan. Artback NT and Kath Papas Productions are co-producing the work in Australia, with Dremedreman Curimudjuq as co-producer in Taiwan. August 2022 to August 2023.
  • Pony Express: The Live Art duo Pony Express along with Performing Lines and Chronus Art Center Shanghai undertake a mixed-reality, interactive Livestream of Epoch Wars. A 5-hour, experiential, subversive video conference meets radical, immersive performance broadcasting simultaneously with the large-scale premiere at New Annual Festival, Newcastle. September to October 2022
  • Arts Project Australia,  Art et al., an inclusive international platform that commissions and presents collaborations between artists from supported studios, artist peers and arts professionals, presented online, from April 2021
  • ARP Press, Winnipeg and Art Gallery of South Australia publication of Becoming Our Future: Global Indigenous Curatorial Practice, in collaboration with the University of Winnipeg, the Canada Council, Australia Council and Creative New Zealand, June 2020
  • Eliza Hull, attendance at SXSW in Austin, Texas, to speak on a panel on disability and accessibility and perform two showcases with her band, including the Sounds Australia showcase and a disability specific showcase, ‘Accessible all areas’, March 2022
  • Genesis Owusu, tour to promote the critically acclaimed ‘Smiling With No Teeth’ album at a series of festivals in the USA and Canada including Lollapalooza Festival, Chicago, OSHEAGA Festival Musique et Arts, Montreal, This Ain’t No Picnic Festival, Los Angeles, and Austin City Limits, Austin, Texas. Alongside his festival schedule, he will be supporting Glass Animals in Nashville, Toronto and Cincinnati in July-August and supporting Khruangbin in Austin, Bentonville, Denver, Las Vegas, Mesa and Santa Fe in September-October 2022
  • Robert Andrew,  A Connective Reveal – Nagula, presented at Yokohama Triennale, July-October 2020
  • Samara Hersch,  Body of Knowledge at Home, presented at Zürcher Theater Spektakel, Zürich, August 2020; Kampnagel Sommerfestival, Hamburg, August 2020; Schwankhalle, Bremen, November 2020; Brut Theatre, Vienna, March 2021; The Theatre Practice, Singapore, April 2021; Spring Festival, Utrecht, May 2021; Impulse Theater Festival, Cologne, June 2021
  • Jamie Lewis,  The Little Old Cooking Club That Could, presented by Drama Box in Singapore, September 2020
  • Pari, P2P and P2P Ngariung, a program of virtual sharing with artist-run collectives and spaces Gudskul in Jakarta, and The White Pube in London and Liverpool, presented online, October-November 2020 and November 2021-January 2022
  • Luke George and Daniel Kok,  Hundreds + Thousands, presented at National Gallery Singapore, March 2021
  • Stephanie Lake Company, Colossus, presented at Chaillot – Théâtre national de la Danse, Paris, June 2021; Taiwan International Festival of the Arts, April 2022; Hong Kong Arts Festival, August 2022.
  • Hannah Fox, Byron J. Scullin and Tom Supple,  Siren Song, presented at Theater der Welt festival, Düsseldorf, June-July 2021
  • Kimberley Moulton, Melbourne Museum, Museums Victoria,  Naadohbii: To Draw Water, in collaboration with Pātaka Art + Museum in Wellington, and the Winnipeg Art Gallery in Winnipeg, presented at the inaugural Winnipeg Indigenous Triennial, August 2021.

Contact

If you have any other questions or need help with the application process, please contact us at international@australiacouncil.gov.au.

We acknowledge the distress, hardship and isolation felt by artists and cultural and creative workers at this time. For support contact Lifeline on 13 11 14, Beyond Blue on 1300 224 636 or Support Act on 1800 959 500.

Support Act facilitates a culturally safe experience for First Nations artists through a dedicated Helpline which is available to access any time of the day or night.